Movie Review: Elysium (2013) (IMAX)

August 10, 2013 in Movie Reviews

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Elysium is a thrilling sci-fi action blockbuster with a thought-provoking premise, but it also requires you to partly switch of your brain to fully enjoy it.

I was expecting an intelligent thriller as Elysium is director Neill Blomkamp’s highly-anticipated follow-up to the acclaimed District 9, which you might recall was a clever and cheeky 2009 sleeper hit inspired by South Africa’s apartheid era. But if you watch Elysium looking forward to the same sharp wit and veiled political commentary you will probably come away disappointed. On the other hand, if all you want is exciting popcorn entertainment, then Elysium will surely satisfy as a violent, white-knuckle thrill ride with a suped-up Jason Bourne.

Towards the end of the 21st century, Earth is overpopulated, polluted and practically in ruins. The wealthy don’t have anything to worry about, because they live on a luxurious man-made community floating above the planet’s atmosphere called Elysium, where there is no poverty, no disease, and presumably, no need for people to commit any crime.

Matt Damon plays Max, an Earthling who dreamed of one day making it to Elysium as a kid but instead grew up to be a crafty criminal — well, ex-criminal, because he now works at a factory manufacturing the same androids that police their sad, wretched, pathetic lives.

I’ll try to tread around spoilers, but of course, Max needs to make it to Elysium at all costs. Standing in his way is Jodie Foster, the defense minister on Elysium, and the crazy South African mad dog she hired to do her dirty work on Earth, played by Sharlto Copley (the protagonist from District 9).

I was surprised that Elysium turned out to be such a straightforward sci-fi action flick (complete with the typical cliches), which may not have been a bad thing had the premise not held so much potential. Yes, there are obvious moral themes that emerge out of the premise, but most of these are only touched upon on the surface.

There are a lot of things left unexplained: How did the world get like this? How did Elysium get built? What’s the political or legal system there and on Earth and between the two? How is it possible that every house on Elysium has a miraculous machine that can cure all diseases (including cancer), perform instant surgeries and even reconstruct body parts — and Earth not even have a single one? Are there no altruistic rich people anymore? I’m not talking about a comprehensive explanation, just some hints. Oh, and I would have loved to have seen more of what people actually do on Elysium — apart from high society afternoon parties and dips in the pool.

And those are just the questions about the background. Elysium also raises many other in-film questions that, if left unanswered, result in Prometheus-sized plot holes. Perhaps I’m being picky, but I had so many questions about what was happening that it became a distraction at times.

If you can put these issues aside and just go along for the ride, however, then you might find Elysium a highly entertaining film powered by near-seamless special effects and inventive sci-fi creations. Watching Matt Damon run around, getting smashed and smashing people and being Matt Damon is never a bad thing anyway.

Elysium has plenty of graphic violence that could shock viewers unfamiliar with Blomkamp’s style, but personally I don’t have a problem with some visceral stimulation every now and then. What I did have a problem with was some of the intentionally shaky camera movements and quick cuts during some of the action sequences, especially the hand-to-hand combat scenes. I just prefer clarity.

The performances were interesting. Matt Damon was his usual steady self, focused and charming and dedicated to the task. He was believable and probably the only character to experience any development throughout the whole movie. Sharlto Copley got to play the cool villain by being a complete nutjob, albeit an extremely dangerous and lethal one. Strangely, it was the dual Academy Award winner, Jodie Foster, who ended up as the weak link. I think she what she could with her flimsy lines, but she couldn’t help that her character was a cardboard cutout who was never as important as we thought she was.

Final word: Viewers expecting Elysium to be Blomkamp’s allegorical portrayal of the world’s growing wealth gap in the same way he tackled apartheid in District 9 might be disappointed. But who says all of his movies need to have a potent political message? In many ways, I actually enjoyed Elysium more than District 9. With a considerably bigger budget (US$115 million vs US$30 million), enhanced star power and an enlarged scale (seeing it on IMAX was particularly stunning), Elysium is one of the year’s more exciting and aesthetically impressive action blockbusters. It might not tick all the boxes, but the film is never boring and should keep audiences completely engaged for its apt 109-minute running time.

3.5 stars out of 5

The Beijing Diaries, Day 9 (Part I): Closing the 18th National Congress

November 23, 2012 in China, Travel

Outside the Great Hall of the People on the final day of the 18th National Congress in Beijing

November 14

Closing Ceremony

The 18th National Congress finally came to an end today, which was a welcome relief considering how exhausting it has been. It also marked the last time I would head over to the Great Hall of the People, where I first attended the glittering opening ceremony a week ago.

According to a notice posted on the media center website, the closing ceremony would take place at around 10:30am, and it advised reporters to get there a little earlier to go through the security check. Unlike some eager beavers who apparently got there at around 3am (I have no idea why), I took a leisurely stroll there from the hotel and arrived shortly before 10am and met with some other journalists in the waiting area (but not before I caught a glimpse of hometown legend Stan Grant, who currently works for CNN, walking up and down the Great Hall stairs doing his best Stan Grant impersonation!).

I’m Stan Grant, formerly from Channel 7′s ‘Real Life’

At precisely 10:30am we began to move in a massive group from the waiting room towards the main hall. For some reason, the crowded journey was very stop-start (mostly stop), and soon we found ourselves stuck in a long corridor with no movement whatsoever. And we remained like that for a good 30 minutes.

I took a photo of this inner quadrangle in the Great Hall of the People. I counted one Volkswagen, one Lexus, and about 50 Audis. Communism at work.

Eventually we moved again into the area outside the main hall, where we waited again for another 20 minutes. No explanations, just waiting. Naturally, we started getting restless and wondered what the hell was going on. It wasn’t like the Communist Party to be so disorganised, having been spot on with the timing of every press conference up to that point. We started speculating — perhaps the mummified former leader Jiang Zemin had a stroke (I personally suspected it might have been a Weekend at Bernie’s situation all along), or maybe future leader Xi Jinping wasn’t “voted” into the Central Committee, sending his comrades into a tailspin.

Anxious reporters wondering how much longer they’d have to wait

Anyway, it wasn’t long before they crushed the rumors by starting to let us in, and soon we were treated to a typical Communist Party charade where the new 205-member Central Committee unanimously passed resolutions to approve reports as well as amendments to the party constitution. It was hilarious watching them all raise their hands to vote in favour of the resolutions, and then watching them pretend to wait to see if there were any dissenting or forfeited votes.

In the end, following a hearty rendition of Internationale (the party’s de facto anthem), outgoing party leader Hu Jintao (“exiting” is probably a better description considering Hu’s personality is anything but “outgoing”) officially declared the “successful” closing of the 18th National Congress. See you again in another five years.

The Communist Party’s new Central Committee

For me, that was also the official end of my “live” reporter duties. There’s the first plenum of the new Central Committee tomorrow where they will “vote” on the new Politburo Standing Committee (the highest and most powerful political body in the land) and introduce China’s new generation of party leaders — but I can’t attend that in person and must watch it from my hotel room on TV (as only one reporter from each news organization gets an invite and I of course wasn’t that person), not that I am complaining because I’ve had enough of all the subway rides and long waits.

Coming up, my afternoon trip to the Great Wall of China!

 
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