Freelancing Diaries: Part 4 — Work-Life Balance

August 18, 2016 in Freelance, On Writing

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Hory shet. Has it really been nearly six months since my last post on this blog? Apparently so.

This is a huge moment for me — it’s the first time since that last post back in February that I have no freelance work on my hands. Well, I have some things lined up, but I haven’t received them yet, so technically I am free — for now. That said, you never know what can happen in the next minute. I guess you can say freelancing is like a box of chocolates — you never know what you’re going to get.

I’m about 10 months into my freelancing experiment, and so far I have been extremely blessed. When I first made the decision to make the switch, my immediate concern was not being able to find any work or having insufficient work to support my family. Instead, it’s been the complete opposite, with one project after another rolling in since Chinese New Year in early February to basically keep me busy every day of the week. I can literally count on one hand the number of days since February where I have not done anything work-related, and this includes all weekends and public holidays, and even the times where I have been travelling or on vacations with my family. Sometimes it might be 15 minutes a day, and at other times — like it has been every day over the past week — it could be 15 hours a day. Either way, there’s always something to be done, whether it is corresponding with clients, doing administrative work (of which there is a surprisingly annoying volume), or doing the actual work.

And that brings me to the focus of this post: Work-life balance.

I have experienced both ends of the spectrum in full-time jobs. In first proper job in a law firm, life did not exist. It’s not that you’re really that busy all the time — it’s more that the job consumes you, in the sense that you can work crazy hours for stretches but you can’t relax even during what is supposed to be downtime. I used to be always tense in the office, and even when I was out of the office, I dreaded knowing that I’d have to go back the next day. Work was always on my mind, as was the dread of work. Just thinking back about those dark days makes my scrote shrivel up.

In my last full-time job as a translator/editor/”journalist”, things were the exact opposite. I was in the office from 9 to 6, five days a week, but the actual hours of work I did was probably around 2 to 4 hours a day. I was focused and put in the effort whenever I actually did the work, though this was a place where the only reward for efficiency was more work, and there were no consequences whatsoever for slacking off. You don’t have to be Stephen Hawking to figure out this was not conducive to a positive work culture. We had 2-hour lunches (sometimes more), played basketball and worked out at the gym, and wasted copious amounts of time on YouTube and social media. I used to think I had wasted a lot of that spare time by not working on something more productive (apart from the odd freelance gig), but now I realise it was practically impossible to pursue personal creative endeavours in such a toxic environment. At least I was in great physical shape and happy to go to work.

As you might imagine, the work-life balance of a freelancer can fluctuate wildly between these two opposite ends. You can be busy as hell or bored out of your mind. Neither is ideal, and that goal of having a sustained and balanced stream of work is really just a fantasy. I have been lucky in the sense that I’ve been at the busy end of the spectrum for essentially six months straight, which has been great from a financial perspective. At the same time, I’ve gotten to do a lot of fascinating and varied work, from doing subtitles for movies and TV shows to translating marketing articles and corporate newsletters to transcribing for YouTube videos and documentaries to ghostwriting letters for ex-presidents and Nobel Prize laureates to even working on church publications. It keeps me interested in the work and motivated to learn and improve. It’s a much more fulfilling lifestyle than my two previous jobs.

In terms of work-life balance, it’s actually a lot better than you’d think. When I have a full plate of work, I usually start working at around 9 or 10 in the morning, after I’ve dropped off the kids to school and had a hearty breakfast. I take a break for an hour or two to have lunch, either at home or out at a nearby cafe or restaurant. In the afternoon I can go home to work, or I can take my laptop to a cafe and keep working away until around 4 (I often concentrate better when there’s a bit of background noise), when it’s time to pick up the kids. If need be, I will keep working after they come home until dinner, and after dinner and after they’ve gone to bed if I have to meet specific deadlines. Most of the time, however, I get the evening off to watch something on TV. When it’s busy I work on weekends as well, but I don’t dread it. You’re thinking about just getting the shit done, not how you’re missing out on the weekend. And that’s largely because you can still do whatever you want during the week by adjusting your schedule. Provided I don’t have any urgent deadlines, I can go watch a movie during the day if I want to. I can go shopping if I want to. I can go away on vacation if I want to. I can go catch up with friends if I want to. In fact, on at least a couple of days a week, I accompany my wife to a mall or shopping district to walk around. If I have work, I’ll just find a cafe or a seat anywhere and do it, while my wife can continue to shop or do whatever she wants. There’s a lot of freedom.

The downside of this kind of work-life balance is that work is never too far away. If a client calls or emails you, you have to answer it. Even when you’re on vacation or overseas, if there’s work to be done you have to find time to do it. And most of the time, work will pop up out of nowhere and derail your plans, especially the ones you’re really looking forward to. Clients will try to squeeze your time so they can have more time, and if you want their business you just have to suck it up. This week, I had been planning to finish a bunch of work on Tuesday so I could watch Suicide Squad and get a massage on Wednesday. However, a client was late in getting work to me, which pushed everything back, and on top of that one of my kids got sick and had to stay at home, so I won’t be able to see the movie until Friday. Judging from the critical reception, perhaps the movie Gods are trying to save me some money.

On the whole, work-life balance of freelancing has been fantastic. I’m earning more money and having more time to spend with my family, plus I find the work more challenging and fulfilling. I certainly wouldn’t exchange it for a day job that pays in the same range. As a freelancer, your time may be dictated by clients, but it is also entirely in your own control because you have the freedom to organise your own schedule and turn down work you don’t want to do. That said, I do recognise that I’m one of the lucky ones. Freelancing could easily be stressful if you’ve constantly got more work than you can handle or if you have no work at all. I would certainly appreciate it if I don’t get any new work for a little while so I can relax and unwind a bit, but of course I would start getting nervous if the situation continues for too long. The only thing I’ve really been sacrificing since the switch to freelancing is health (well, and this blog too, I guess). To be honest, I haven’t done much exercise for the past 6 months and it’s starting to show. It’s just hard to get into a routine when work always takes priority, and even when you have spare time you’re so tired you just want to relax. As I’ve said countless times before, things are going to change starting next week!

 

If there are any pearls of wisdom on improving work-life balance that I can impart to people thinking about taking the freelance plunge it would be these:

  1. Find regular clients. The key is to add more routine and take out the unpredictability, so if you can get clients who can feed you a steady stream of work at roughly fixed times and intervals, it will make your life will be a whole lot easier. My next post is going to be on dealing with clients, so stay tuned!
  2. Don’t procrastinate. Be motivated to get stuff done immediately and leave it until the last minute because shit always pops up when you least expect it to and your basket will end up overfilled. Procrastination guarantees a stressful approach to deadlines, so avoid it as best as you can.
  3. Do good work. This is related to the first point of finding regular clients. If your work is consistently good, you will get repeat work and new clients through recommendations. People may even find you because of your reputation. The more regular clients you have, the easier it becomes to manage your schedule and the less you have to worry about work drying up.

Anyway, I’m looking forward to watching more movies and catching up on my movie and book reviews, exercising and getting back to playing some basketball.

PS: I’m not kidding about this — just as I was about to press the “Publish” button a got an email with more work. Such is the life of a freelancer.

Freelancing Diaries: Part 2 — Pros & Cons

December 8, 2015 in Freelance

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Well, the time off between my last post and this one is indicative of how much less free time I thought I would have when I first embarked on the freelancing journey.

Every time you think you’re going to have a block of time to do something like read or do a blog post, something else inevitably pops up. Case in point: I had just finished a couple of projects last week and still had an easy one I thought I could take my time with, but on Monday I received an urgent call asking me to be an interpreter for a foreign production team in Taiwan working on a big concert over the next couple of weeks.

I initially declined because, as a freelancer, I wanted some “free” time. My family had already planned a weekend away with friends during the days of the concert and was planning a birthday party for my little boy. But then my wife and other family members convinced me I had been an idiot and that I shouldn’t have turned down the opportunity. Holidays can be rescheduled and kids parties aren’t that important in the scheme of things (they don’t even know what day it is anyway), but great cases like this one don’t come around very often.

It’s not easy — 14 days of interpretation and translating documents on demand, attending meetings and being around for the entire set-up and testing process as well as all rehearsals and playing an integral part in the actual concerts (I’ll be interpreting the video director’s commands to the cameramen throughout the shows). It means consecutive early mornings and late nights (I had a 16-hour day yesterday and had to be back by 7am this morning), which would have been fine 10 years ago, but now, after having worked in the cruisiest job known to mankind for four years, I’m really starting to feel it.

That said, it’s an awesome gig. You get to meet a lot of great industry people (personally I don’t care much about meeting the artists and celebrities and what not) who can open up a lot of doors for you in the future. You learn a heck of a lot in a short amount of time. You get to experience a major production and see everything close up. And most of all it pays very very well. In hindsight it should have been a no-brainer, and I would recommend would-be freelancers to never reject a case outright — say you need to check your schedule or some other excuse and you’ll get back to them soon. Then sit down, have a good think about it, speak to people and make some calculations if you have to. Then make the decision. I was just lucky I still had a chance to get the gig back this time.

Accordingly, I thought now would be the perfect time to discuss some pros and cons of the freelancing life. So here goes:

Pro: Be Your Own Boss

This is probably be biggest difference between being a freelancer and working for someone else. It changes everything when you are working for yourself.

When you work for a company like I did, for instance, you might want the best for your company, but ultimately you still put yourself first. And of course that should be the case. But often your personal interests and the interests of the company aren’t necessarily always aligned. You might want to go out for a long lunch, start work late or leave work early for whatever reason, and as a result your work will suffer. But if it doesn’t affect your pay or your performance review, you probably don’t really care that your company’s productivity is affected.

When you work for yourself, you’ll naturally want everything you do to be the best it can be, because your interests and the interests of your business are completely aligned. It no longer becomes what you can get away with — it becomes genuine compromise. And it’s compromise that has real consequences you care about.

Pro: Flexibility

What I love most about being a freelancer. If the new Star Wars movie comes out, I can catch the first session in the morning. I can go to any movie or restaurant when there aren’t as many people. I can go shopping, spend time with my kids, go to the gym — basically do whatever I want, whenever I want. In theory.

In reality though, it’s still about compromise. Yeah, you might be able to go watch a movie during the day, but if you have urgent work on you might have to cancel — sometimes at the last minute. Or you might have to work late into the night or even all through the night instead just to maintain that flexibility. Alternatively, you’ll just earn no money and you soon won’t be able to afford going to the movies.

Con: Can be hard to get motivated

Freelancing is a double-edged sword. You can work really hard and make way more than holding down a day job, or you can be really lazy and stare at the wall all day and find yourself in financial strife. It’s up to you, really, and I think I’m lucky in that I’ve been highly motivated in my first 6 weeks or so as a freelancer. I want to get more work and I don’t mind doing more, even if it’s just for the money.

That said, I can definitely see the other side too. I was very unmotivated at my previous job because there was zero accountability and productivity had no correlation to performance. That is rare though, and I’d imagine in most regular jobs people would do their best to earn higher bonuses and pay rises, etc. More importantly, you’ll probably have some authority figure or supervisor making sure you do your work and do it well. As a freelancer, the whip cracker is yourself, so you might end up being really unproductive if you just can’t get the motivation to do your work. This happens a lot especially if the deadline is not urgent. I had the same problem as a student, leaving everything to the last minute. You get tempted to surf the net and watch what Jordan Schlanky is up to on YouTube or check out what’s on TV or in the fridge every two minutes. Anything but work.

If you fall into that category you need to fix that mentality or stay in your day job. I have a feeling I may have to battle the motivation demon eventually. Things are just too fresh and exciting and busy right now for me to get lazy. And besides, I need all the money I can get right now.

Pro: Do what you want and enjoy

This is another major reason I chose the freelancing life. As much as I didn’t mind my old job, I didn’t love it. I liked the hours and some of the people and the cruisiness and being up-to-date with world news, but I didn’t like a lot of the actual articles I was translating. Plus I hated the company and the disgusting office and the way the organisation was being run.

On the other hand, I love translating movies and TV shows and songs. It’s fun and varied and I enjoy doing it. Makes a whole world of difference if you have to sit in front of a computer anyway.

Of course, I don’t love every case I get (even so, when the work is directly linked to your income you don’t mind it as much), but by and large it’s a much better situation for me and my family than it was before. And I still get to keep in touch with my old colleagues.

Con: Can’t say no

I mentioned this in my last post about freelancing and I believe it is true. As a freelancer, saying “No” to a case that comes knocking could be a fatal mistake. It’s particularly true for clients who are not regular or repeat customers.

We’re all creatures of habit: all things being equal, those who employ freelancers will tend to go back to the last person they used, so if you say no, you might lose that client forever. Most of my clients these days have come from friends or colleagues who couldn’t do a case for whatever reason, and since then I’ve become their primary source of translation cases. Even this lucrative concert deal I am on now came from a friend referral; I originally translated an album for the band, and then a month later some old songs for the upcoming concert, and now I’m suddenly interpreting for the production team.

Conversely, there have been a couple of cases I’ve turned down in the last couple of years (either because the money was too low or I didn’t think I could do it) and I never heard from them again. In fact, this includes a friend who wanted me to translate something for them for free.

So if you’re going to be a freelancer, you better be prepared to say “Yes” to everything, no matter how impossible it may seem — until you can afford to say “No.”

Pro: Make a lot more money

Though you could also make a lot less money, I still say this is a “pro” because you have the “potential” to make a lot more. If you’re in a normal job you can only hope for pay rises and bonuses, but if you freelance you can, theoretically, make as much as time permits.

Granted, this involves having enough cases and cases that pay well, but once you get that stream flowing and you maximise your efficiency, the freelancing life can be much more lucrative. More money and less work hours. Who doesn’t want that?

Con: Flat out or starving

I’ve been mostly flat out thus far, but I hear the freelancing life is one of extremes. One experienced freelancer told me that you’re either flat out with work and stressing out over deadlines or bored out of your mind with no work and stressing out about paying the bills.

So yes, freelancing can be stressful either way, but as this same freelancer told me, it’s really about managing your time and making compromises. That way you don’t have to be flat out or starving — you can be reasonably busy or enjoying your free time instead.

The Freelancing Diaries: Part 1 — Getting Started is Rough

November 27, 2015 in Freelance

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As followers of this blog will know by now, I’ve quit my day job to pursue the freelancing (and writing) dream. It’s a beautiful dream, but also one that can potentially turn into a bloody nightmare. I’ve decided to chronicle this adventure in a new series of posts, starting with, naturally, what life is like when first taking the plunge.

Technically, I’m now in my third week as a freelancer, but I still don’t feel like one. Apart from finalising shit from my previous job, I’m still trying to get used to the lifestyle, the self-discipline, and the pressure and fear of the unknown that comes with freelancing. I’ve had days off where I’ve gone out to watch movies, take the kids out on day trips and shop around aimlessly like a socialite, but I’ve also been fortunate enough — or unfortunate enough, depending on your perspective — to have cases to keep me busy already. I translated some songs for an upcoming concert, I did an episode of a TV show, some usual corporate stuff and transliteration work, and even took on my first nerve-racking interpretation cases (I’ll have to write about that experience in another post). There have been days where I’ve felt a bit of pressure and had to work much longer hours than I did as a company employee, but it’s all part of the package.

What this means though is that I haven’t done much work to lay the necessary groundwork to be a full-time freelancer, let alone do any of the stuff I had fantasized about doing with all that supposed free time, such as writing and exercising. Taking into account the amount of time I still require to complete outstanding cases and other odds and ends, I think I need about one more week or get my affairs in order. This involves sending out “feeler” emails and making cold calls to potential clients, completing tests for freelance outsourcing websites and really setting up my “system” properly.

Anyway, here are some things I have already learned for those in the same boat or are thinking about venturing down the same path.

1. Starting out is rough

When I first started informing people — especially other freelancers — of my intention to freelance full time, the vast majority were highly encouraging, but warned that the beginning will involve a very difficult adjustment period. For me, in particular, having been practically a bum for the last four years at my last job, it was going to take some time getting used to it.

However, the adjustment is much more than getting used to something new. Freelancing brings with it an inherent and immediate pressure because your income will no longer be stable like it used to be. Some clients might take weeks or even months to pay, so if finances are tight you will have to factor in the delays. For instance, I recently had to chase up a client who hadn’t paid for work I did more than three months ago (I contacted him last month, actually, and he assured me that it would be paid within three months). First the client ignored my emails completely, but when I called him on the phone he said the money had “come down” and would be paid in the next few days. And really, there’s not much you can do.

Secondly, you need to be instantly better at organising your life. You need to set aside time to do work, preferably on a regular schedule, but you also need to be prepared for things that pop up, as they inevitably do. And unlike before, when you can use “I’m at work” as an excuse, you may have to drop whatever you’re doing and attend to it. You need to have a system for your accounts, so you can better track your clients and payments. I used to just dump files all over the place and lose track of them, but now I’ve had to set up a spreadsheet containing the details and contacts of each case and use Google Drive to file documents away systematically.

Thirdly, and most importantly, you need clients, otherwise you’re not going to get paid.

2. Finding clients — the right clients — is the key

Finding enough clients to sustain the your lifestyle is usually the biggest obstacle to being a freelancer. The best thing is regular clients who can feed you stable work every month, but in the beginning anyone will do. But clients won’t just come to you because you’re a freelancer — you need to go out and track them down.

But how does one go about it? Honestly, if you’ve never done any freelance work at all or don’t have any pre-existing contacts, the task is virtually impossible. I’ve discovered the painful truth that in freelancing it is often all about who you know. I would have never been able to be a full-time freelancer had I not slowly built up a small network of contacts over the last four years. One of the first things I did was to contact my freelancing friends and clients I’ve done work for and tell them I was going to freelance full-time and to send any work they have my way. There are still a few outstanding ones I haven’t been in touch with for a couple of years I’ll have to get to next week.

The other way is to go out and look for clients through other channels. Before doing that you will of course have to fully update your CV and have it ready to be sent out at any time. You can look up the companies doing the sort of work you can help with and email them or cold call them to really sell your services. Most are unlikely to respond, but sometimes all you need is one that does, and that may end up opening doors to more opportunities. You can also try through updating your LinkedIn profile or search for freelancing agencies or websites that post freelancing opportunities — but more on that in my next point.

And even when you finally find a client who is willing to give you work, sometimes you’ll still have tough decisions to make because they’re not always necessarily the right client. What if they are paying you too little for it to be worth your time? Is it better to work for peanuts or have no peanuts at all? What if you happen to be too busy when they decide to give you a piece of work? I’ve heard that one of the cardinal sins of being a freelancer is to refuse work from anyone you would like to work for in the future. If you’ve turned them down once they’ll just go to others who won’t.

I recently turned down a regular freelancing job that seemed ideal on paper. Two to three hours a day, five days a week, and I’d make close to three-fifths of my previous salary. The work was similar to what I was doing before and would be relatively easy for me. I even did a sample translation test and all that. In the end, however, I decided it wasn’t worth it. Though it was only two to three hours a day, it was always the same fixed hours of the day (2pm-5pm), taking away the flexibility I wanted as a freelancer. The rates weren’t horrendous, but they weren’t great either, and I’d have to work my way up to the maximum pricing and volume over a number of months. So in reality, I’d probably be making a fifth of my previous salary for a couple of months, then two-fifths for another couple of months, and so forth, with no guarantees I’d actually get to the three-fifths mark. Not good enough to sacrifice my flexibility for.

3. Be wary of agencies and freelancing websites

As noted above, one of the avenues to look for work is freelancing agencies and websites. Examples include established enterprises such as Freelancer, or the newer WritePath. I’ve also been looking at a Japan-based one called Gengo. In Taiwan, a lot of people use freelance job aggregators such as 104case or 518case, which are similar to Freelancer in that people post freelancing cases for people to bid on, though you have to pay a subscription fee to be able to gain access to the case contacts. As a translator, there are also plenty of translation agencies that will get the work for you in return for a percentage of your earnings.

Personally, while I’d recommend trying them out, I wouldn’t get your hopes up about being able to get sustainable work from such options. For starters, most of these gigs will require you to take a free-of-charge translation test, which can be time consuming and a waste of time. A lot of them are old cases that closed ages ago but people just haven’t bothered taking them down. I’ve also heard of horror stories where some a-hole companies will split their case up into say five parts and then send them to five applicants and tell them it’s their translation test. That’s basically their entire case done for free.

Most of the time, however, it’s just a company looking for ways to push prices down as low as possible. When you have desperate people fighting for work, the rates gets lowered to appalling levels, and they almost always tend to be urgent cases. In the translation industry, they often don’t even care how good or bad the quality of the translation is, as long as it’s cheap. To be fair, there are some awful translators out there who don’t give a shit if they get paid low because it matches the time and effort they put in, but what it does is ruin the market for everyone else. You also have to remember that if the market is international there will be people in say India or China who are willing to work for a lot less.

Translation agencies are the worst because they don’t respect you at all. It’s always urgent cases at basement rates, and they end up taking around 50%-75% of the earnings for doing nothing.  I remember one instance where I did a translation test for free and later received a call on a Friday afternoon asking me to take on an urgent case due the next morning, for less a quarter of the rate I normally charge for standard cases. I said no and never heard from them again.

4. Pricing sucks balls

Negotiating your rates is one of the most annoying things for me as a freelancer. I’ve read around and it seems the general consensus is to never sell yourself short when in discussions. But what constitutes selling yourself short is such a tough question. You don’t want to rip yourself off, but you don’t want to price yourself out of the market either. Most of the time you’ll probably be wondering if you’ve done one or the other. I’ll have to do a full post on this some day after I’ve generate a bit more experience on this point.

5. You never have as much time as you think you do

The most sobering revelation from my three weeks as a freelancer is that you never have as much time as you think you’d have. When I was working a full-time job and doing freelancing cases on the side, I thought to myself that if I were doing freelancing full-time I’d have endless hours of free time on my hands to do all the other things I’d want to do. That’s not the case, at least not in these initial starting-off weeks.

Freelancing cases take time, often a lot of time, and you probably end up spending more time on the same cases as a full-timer because you care more about building up your reputation so you can win more work. Plus, in the past my freelancing was extra cream on top of the cake, whereas now it’s the actual cake. As a result, I actually feel busier than I did before. Just a couple of months ago I was still wasting hours a day zoning out in front of the computer wondering why I wasn’t being more productive, and now I’m working hard but wondering where all my time has gone. It’s more stress but it’s also infinitely more rewarding doing stuff you care about.

Oh well, better get back to it.

‘Getting Started as a Freelance Writer’ by Robert W Bly

September 15, 2011 in Best Of, Book Reviews, On Writing, Reviews

Robert W Bly is one of the most successful freelance writers in the world. He earns over US$600,000 a year and was a self-made millionaire whilst still in his 30s. And according to his book, ‘Getting Started as a Freelance Writer‘, you can too. Well, maybe not to that extent, but Bly believes even an average writer can earn $100,000 a year (that’s $400 a day, five days a week for 50 weeks) by simply following the principles he has devised in his book.

So is the book everything it promises to be? Hard to answer. Bly does offer many tips to people who are already freelance writers or are aspiring to be freelance writers, and most of that advice is fantastic and can help you become extremely successful, but it’s not exactly a ‘getting started’ guide as the title suggests. In reality, the book is a guide on how to be a ‘successful’ freelance writer who can potentially make a comfortable living, but if you are a writer with little or no experience in freelance writing hoping this book will provide a miracle shortcut to a cruisy lifestyle then you might be sorely disappointed.

Bly does not sugar coat it — freelancing is hard work. Extremely hard work. To make a comfortable living you’ll need to treat it like a business. You’ll have to make sacrifices. Work 50 or 60 hour weeks. Only get a week or two off a year. Kill your social life. There is no secret formula.

But on the bright side, freelancing does have its advantages. Flexibility. Being your own boss. Write about things you are interested in. Fairly good money. For many people, like me, being able to write for a living is a good enough reason in itself.

Then what does this book offer in terms of constructive advice? There are a few very important points that Bly tries to drill into his readers.

First of all, in order to make good money in freelance writing, you have little choice but to pursue commercial projects — that is, write for businesses. Marketing brochures, technical writing, annual reports, speechwriting, direct marketing, etc. These are the only types of writing jobs that will make you enough money on a regular basis to sustain a comfortable living. Sure, you can submit the occasional magazine or newspaper article, poem or short story, but there’s simply not enough money or regular work to survive on if that’s all you do.

Secondly, marketing and networking are just as important as, if not more important than, your actual writing ability (after all, I did receive this book in the mail from the publisher without asking for it, and Bly makes numerous references to his other guides in the book). It doesn’t matter how fantastic a writer you are if people don’t know who you are. Bly suggests that you treat your freelancing job like a proper business — organised, with proper files, business cards, letterheads, websites, newsletters, and so forth. Networking is also imperative — joining relevant clubs and societies, attending functions, workshops and conferences are all part of the job. You have to be a salesman — you might have to cold call potential clients (ie call them out of the blue), explain to them what you can do for their business, make yourself stand out from the pack. And once you get a client, you have to nurture the relationship to garner more work in the future. It’s exactly the type of stuff that shy, introverted writers might hate doing.

Thirdly, you have to work like a freaking Trojan and understand that time is your most valuable asset. Don’t waste your time doing things that will take you away from your writing. Hire people to do things if they can do it more efficiently than you can — your time is better spent doing what makes you money — ie, writing! For instance, Bly hires assistants to do all the stuff he doesn’t want to deal with, like running down to the post office, researching, negotiating fees and doing the accounts. Since he earns much more per hour than they do, he can afford to do so.

Other tips include specialising in a few niche areas rather than be a jack of all trades (clients prefer specialists, you can charge more, and it cuts down research time if you’ve written something similar before), recycling and reselling your old work, don’t sell yourself short and be persistent in wooing clients and tracking payments.

Now, all of this is fabulous advice — but probably for someone further down the track and with a little bit of writing experience and business savvy. What about the newbies who are genuinely just ‘getting started’? Surely it can’t be a wise idea for someone who hasn’t had much work published to start printing a stack of business cards, hire a secretary and research assistant, writing newsletters and calling random strangers out of the blue.

I suppose that’s the thing that disappointed me most about this book. While it does include a chapter suggesting ‘entry level’ work such as writing for a local newspaper and a couple of other vague ideas, there really wasn’t a whole lot of precise information for the true beginner. There’s probably a good reason for that; most people don’t go straight into freelance writing from an unrelated profession (Bly himself had worked in writing/marketing roles before switching to full time freelancing) but it would have been good to see some more concrete suggestions and realistic ideas on where to look for well-paid work when you’re just starting out.

While I would have liked to have seen more pages on the ‘getting started’ part of the profession, I would have liked to have seen less from the chapters on stuff such as poetry, novel writing and short fiction — areas that didn’t really deserve more than a couple of paragraphs and are covered in much greater depth by other books.

The one undeniably great thing about this book is that it can help you decide whether or not you are really cut out for a freelancing lifestyle. You might read it and think, darn, this is all far too hard and involves too much work I don’t want to do, or you might think, fantastic, I can definitely picture myself doing this for a living. It could motivate you into freelancing or it could scare you out of it — either way, it can assist you in making an informed decision about your future.

As for me — I was very excited when I received the book in the post. Freelancing seemed like the perfect life for a writer, and I had often been told by those in the industry that freelancers had the best of both worlds — write for a living but not being tied down by the constraints of a normal day job. It seemed too good to be true, and as this book has revealed, it kind of is. You really do need a fair bit of experience or have worked in a related industry to be able to jump into a freelancing career.

The most heartening thing about Bly’s book is finding out that being a freelance writer can be a viable career for those willing to put in the effort. Looking around online, all you see these days are content mills paying writers atrocious rates such as a cent a word, or less. However, what this book demonstrates is that there are well-paid writing jobs out there if you know how to find them, if you know how to sell yourself and obtain the all-important contacts for repeat work. It’s not a silver bullet but it could be exactly what struggling and/or writers need to boost their careers.

3.75 out of 5

A Writer’s Life — is it worth it?

August 8, 2011 in Blogging, Misc, On Writing

Source: http://healthessays.webs.com

It’s been a while since my last post (by my standards).  And no, it’s not because I’ve been sitting around thinking about just how awesome Rise of the Planet of the Apes was (and it was).

Apart from the usual and the unusual errands and chores and busted tyres and rodent extermination, I’ve been busy planning a few things.  With my masters degree in writing almost in hand and another country move in the works (to Asia this time), it’s time to start thinking about the next phase of my working life.  CVs, scans of published works, contacting contacts to make more contacts — I’m doing it all.

Naturally, if I wanted a life of material comfort (though it wouldn’t be much of a ‘life’), I could easily return to the law, but doing so would be against everything I’ve promised myself over the last few years, and to be frank, it makes my bladder shudder just thinking about it.  I had a nightmare the other night where I was back at the old firm and if I hadn’t woken up from the fright I might have embarrassed myself in bed.  Living in a constant state of stress and terror doing something that I can barely tolerate can’t be the answer for the next 30+ years of my life.

No, any career from here must be a career in writing.  I don’t know if it will last or how it will turn out, but if I don’t at least give it a shot I’m going to regret it forever.

The first thing most people say when they hear about someone (such as myself) wanting to write, is that it’s really really hard.  Really hard.  Don’t quit your say job.  Hardships are ahead — financially, socially, emotionally.  Success stories are one in a million (well, I guess it depends on your definition of ‘success’ — is it JK Rowling or a relatively comfortable living?).

But surely it can’t be that bad, or else there won’t be that many writers out there.  My advantage (or at least what I consider to be an advantage) is that I’m not fussy about the kind of work I do, as long as it involves writing (for the smart-arses out there, that excludes contracts and legal advices) and, as the great George W Bush once said, puts food on the family.

I’m quite flexible with the field or the area or the type of writing.  I can write formal, technical, colloquial, serious, comical, satirical or just plain old conversational.  Just looking around online in Sydney, there appear to be quite a few relatively well-paid jobs for someone in my position.  Legal publishing is a pretty decent route to go, or at least as a stepping stone.  Traditional publishing and media jobs are available — not quite as well paid but not as bad as I had expected.

But this time I’m heading to Asia and from what I’ve heard, writers get paid peanuts (sometimes literally).  There are plenty of jobs that require English writing, so the concern is not to find a job, it’s finding the right job.

There are options.  I can try educational publishing and write books which help local children learn English.  I can go into media and work at a newspaper or magazine that publishes in English.  I can try academic writing/editing, helping out local professors polish up their works in English.  I can try technical writing for a company.  I can even try something in government.  None of these pay well by Western standards but at least I have absolutely no problem seeing myself in one of these roles.  And all of them will provide me with much needed experience.

Perhaps supplementing a day job with freelance writing or editing might be feasible (I’m reading up on that), but it’s not easy for newbies without the experience or portfolio to back them up.  I was just looking around online randomly for freelancing opportunities and saw that quite a few people offer $1 for every 500 words!  Can you believe that?  A dollar!

That said, a lot of freelancers I’ve come across love what they do and wouldn’t change it for anything in the world.  I’d like to be able to say that one day.

I think I am prepared mentally for what lies ahead.  I’m confident in my abilities but I know hard work and luck are imperative — though I believe former swimmer Grant Hackett said it best when he said that the harder he worked, the luckier he got.

If any writers out there are reading, please share your story and how you got to where you are today.  Was it worth it?  And any tips, pointers or pearls of wisdom you might be able to bequeath?