Movie Review: Need for Speed (2014)

April 26, 2014 in Movie Reviews, Reviews

need_for_speed

I love Aaron Paul, but I’m fairly certain I prefer him as a meth cook than a racing car driver.

Need for Speed (not the drug, of course, as Aaron Paul prefers blue meth), based on one of the most successful video game franchises of all-time, tells the story of Toby Marshall (Paul), a former professional racer who turns to tuning performance cars to make a living. Tragedy strikes, as it usually does, and Toby is made to suffer for it, but soon after he’s plotting his revenge. And that revenge somehow entails driving in a racing car across the country with an attractive British lass (Imogen Poots) while lots of people try to kill him.

Video game adaptations that aren’t utter crap are hard to come by these days, and I guess you could make an argument that Need for Speed is not utter crap. It’s certainly not great, and not even particularly good, but it’s passable entertainment. And its box office success (US$186 million on a US$66 million budget) means there could be more entries. That said, the status of Fast & Furious as the definitive Hollywood car racing franchise remains safe.

The most positive thing I can say about the film is that its driving sequences are done pretty well. I personally don’t care much about cars but even I have to admit that the vehicles look very pretty, and they look even prettier driving at 200+ miles per hour while weaving through traffic, escaping gunfire and evading the police. I didn’t see the film in IMAX or 3D, but I can imagine it being quite a visual feast (the IMAX at least, not so sure about the 3D).

Everything else is where I struggle to come up with positive things to say. The plot, of course, is preposterous. You know that just from the short description I gave above. None of it really makes any sense, and if you think about it too hard your brain might explode. Revenge through racing in an underground competition? — I still can’t get my head around it. The motivations of the characters and their reactions are all over the place, and it’s best if you try and treat it like a video game for the sake of your sanity.

Unlike the Fast & Furious franchise, the characters are bland. Even with an actor the calibre of Aaron Paul, the lead character of Toby Marshall is weak. There’s just nothing about him. The same can be said for everyone else, from Imogen Poots’s obvious love interest to the boring and one-dimensional villain played by Dominic Cooper. As for the radio DJ played by Michael Keaton, who spends the entire film commentating, I don’t even know what to say. It weirded me out, to be honest.

And that’s where the film falls apart — it’s inability to connect with audiences with anything other than action scenes. It sure tries, with plenty of attempts at “emotion” and a hefty running time of 130 minutes, which is just ridiculous, though ultimately there is nothing memorable about it. The really pathetic attempts at humour, even of the cheesy kind, also bothered me, though I was pleasantly surprised that they did not try to sexualise the movie with a lot of scantily-clad ladies or obligatory sex scenes, which I thought were a given in flicks about cool cars. On the other hand, there was no shortage of cringeworthy “whoa”, “yeah”, “cool”, “awesome” moments which I’m sure the younger (and dumber) generations will love.

Overall, more or less what I expected. Nice car racing scenes and a dash of Aaron Paul intensity, but that’s about all that’s got going for it.

2.5 stars out of 5

Mega Catch-up Movie Blitz (Part 8)

December 18, 2012 in Movie Reviews, Reviews

The Art of Getting By (2011)

The Art of Getting By

This is a really weird movie which I don’t really get. It’s the first feature from writer-director Gavin Wiesen and I believe it’s supposed to be a coming-of-age comedy drama, although the whole thing just felt kind of “meh” to me.

George (Freddie Highmore) is a high school student and gifted artist who is a rut because he finds life meaningless. He is put on academic probation and told to get his act together, and at around the same time he meets a pretty girl, Sally (Emma Roberts). They form a bond, become friends and maybe something more.

See, even writing that brief synopsis was boring to me. I’ve always been a fan of Highmore and I think Roberts is a cute actress, and both put in solid performances, but the film itself failed to sustain my interest (and it’s only 84 minutes!).

Perhaps I am getting too old, but for some reason the actions and dialogue of these kids seemed totally unrealistic to me. It’s not just they are so self-absorbed but watching them act and talk like adults made them lose whatever charm they had. I didn’t find them innocent or sweet at all.

There might have been a bigger message in the film somewhere but it jumped right over my head.

1.5 stars out of 5

Drive Angry (2011) (2D)

DriveAngryPoster

Another Nicolas Cage movie where he’s paid to be Nicholas Cage? Yes, that’s precisely what Drive Angry (which is supposed to be in 3D at the cinemas, though I caught it on the small screen) is all about.

Cage plays Milton, a felon who breaks out from Hell (yes, the opposite of Heaven) to prevent a satanic cult led by Billy Burke (the dad from Twilight) from sacrificing his granddaughter. Somewhere along the way he picks up a waitress played by Amber Heard. Lots of gun fights, car chases and explosions ensue.

Surprisingly, however, Drive Angry is not as bad as it sounds. Sure, it’s forgettable and blends into all of the other B-grade films Cage has made in recent years, but at least it is occasionally fun and doesn’t take itself too seriously. Classier moviegoers might be turned off by all the relentless, over-the-top violence, the loud sound effects and the ludicrous but unapologetic plot, but those looking for a silly albeit entertaining grindhouse flick might find it a guilty pleasure.

By the way, the score probably would have been lower had I watched it in cash-sucking 3D.

3 stars out of 5

The Rum Diary (2011)

rum diary

I am a fan of Hunter S Thompson’s writing and his Gonzo journalism, so I was kind of excited about a film based on his novel starring Johnny Depp. But The Rum Diary turned out to be slightly disappointing. It was occasionally entertaining and amusing but felt like there was no focus and the film drifted all over the place without a compelling storyline to follow.

Depp plans Paul Kemp, a down-on-his-luck writer who gets a job for a paper in Puerto Rico. There are shady deals, lots of drinking and crazy shenanigans, but nothing that really gripped me to the characters or the plot.

Depp is pretty good, as is the steady Aaron Eckhart. Amber Heard is very good as the seductress, so good, apparently, that she ended up breaking up Depp’s marriage. Oh well.

On the whole, The Rum Diary is not bad for some light amusement (although it felt too long with a 2-hour running time), but it’s ultimately quite forgettable.

2.5 stars out of 5

The Devil’s Double (2011)

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The Devil’s Double is apparently a true story based on the life of Latif Yahia, who looked so much like Saddam Hussein’s son Uday that he was forced to be his body double.

The story has not stood up well after several debunking attempts, but I still found the concept utterly fascinating. Imagine being forced to be the doppelganger of the son of a ruthless tyrant and being sent to do all the crap he doesn’t want to do and the places he doesn’t want to go. It also means constantly being placed in danger and having no way out – well, apart from torturous deaths for you and your family.

Dominic Cooper players the duel role of Latif and Uday and he is dynamite. There was never any doubt in my mind that he was two completely separate people, and it’s not just because of the clever make-up and prosthetics that made their appearances slightly different, at least at the beginning before the forced plastic surgery. Can’t believe was only nominated for a single Saturn Award for this performance.

It’s a flawed film with an overdose of brutality and occasional lulls in the narrative, but Cooper’s performance and the premise alone were enough to keep me interested for the majority of the 108-minute running time.

3.75 stars out of 5

 
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