Saluting Bryce Courtenay

December 6, 2012 in Best Of, On Writing

I’ll admit, I’ve never read any of the 20 or so books written by Aussie legend Bryce Courtenay, who passed away late last month. I haven’t even seen the movie based on his first and most famous book, The Power of One. All I know is that there the film launched the career of Stephen Dorff, that Daniel Craig played a young Nazi in it, and that there is a “young reader’s edition” of the novel, which must mean it’s a pretty big deal.

A young Daniel Craig as a Nazi in The Power of One

What has prompted me to write this post is the Walkley Award (the highest journalism award in Australia) winning article by Jane Cadzow in the Good Weekend, which provided some fascinating insights into the life of this professional writer and the amount of dedication it requires getting to and staying at the top. Hard work and determination are common themes seen in almost all the success stories I have come across, and it has me wondering if I’ll ever be able to be even half as dedicated as some of these people.

The article paints Courtenay as a fascinating fellow who is probably one of the biggest bullshit artists Australia has ever seen. Even the people closest to him admit that he embellishes (to put it in the kindest way possible), but Cadzow effectively tears apart most of Courtenay’s fanciful claims about his life.

It may be his ability to lie that makes Courtenay such a brilliant storyteller, but it’s his background as an advertising guru that helped him break out from the pack in the first place. As the article says:

When Courtenay decided to become a novelist, his marketing nous stood him in good stead. “There are writers in this country who are better than me,” he says, echoing the words of many a reviewer. But no one disputes that when it comes to pitching a book to the paying public, the former adman is in a class of his own. Who else tests cover designs with focus groups, distributes sample chapters at railway stations and hires sky-writers to emblazon titles high above cities? With one of his novels, he went so far as to launch a tie-in beer (Tommo & Hawk Premium Ale). “Bryce is, beyond anything else, a promoter,” says Hamill. “There are some great authors in Australia, and I know many of them, who won’t get off their bums and sign books in shopping centres.”

Whereas Courtenay is never happier than sitting in-store with a pen in his hand and a queue of fans in front of him. Owen Denmeade, another of his old advertising mates, salutes him for the enthusiasm he brings to the task. How many title pages has he autographed over the years? Denmeade hates to think. “We used to say, if you’ve got an unsigned copy of a Bryce Courtenay book, it’s worth a lot of money.”

Sometimes all you need is a break. Off the back of the success of The Power of One, which he was apparently terrified would fail, Courtenay became one of Australia’s most successful writers, with his books selling 9.5 million volumes (including almost 8 million in Australia) since 1997. In better times, a new Courtenay book would apparently sell 250,000 copies, whereas now it’s around 200,000. That’s simply incredible considering what a small market Australia is.

The other thing about Courtenay that impressed me was his tenacity. He apparently worked 12 hours a day, from 7am to 7pm, seven days a week. For you mathematical geniuses out there, that’s 84 hours of writing a week, 4,368 hours of writing a year. Of course, it’s likely he bullshitted about that as well, but the fact of the matter is that he had been launching decently-sized books just about every year. As the article says:

Courtenay takes seven months to write a novel. He starts work the day after Australia Day [January 26] and finishes on August 31, delivering each chapter to Penguin on completion to ensure that the book can be edited, printed and in the shops for the Christmas rush. “The last six books I’ve finished within an hour of each other,” he says, “right to the point of having a courier waiting for the last chapter at the front door.”

To help him keep to such a tight timetable, he employs a full-time researcher, his brother-in-law Bruce Gee. “Like a lot of people, he’s not a terribly quick reader,” says Bruce. “My job is to get information to him in a predigested form.” Also entrusted with checking each day’s output for errors, Bruce points out that he isn’t the only one on the payroll. “People advise us on music, for instance, and on esoteric things like historical railways. All sorts of stuff … Bryce is almost a cottage industry.”

Courtenay’s deteriorating health prevented him from delivering his final book, Jack of Diamonds, on time last year, and the disappointment he expressed is remarkable for a guy who supposedly wouldn’t have had to make another dime had he lived to 100.

Courtenay was inconsolable about missing his first deadline in two decades. “I know how stupid it is,” he says, “but when you have one of those A-type personalities where achievement is important, and you have my kind of background, then … failure is unthinkable.”

Then again, it could be because Courtenay needed the money (though he says money doesn’t interest him), which is a frightening thought for all struggling writers out there. According to his brother-in-law, Courtenay was not as wealthy as might be imagined.

“He’s lost it, given it away, made bad business decisions, whatever.”

So the moral of the story, I suppose is to work really really hard, be a perfectionist, spend extra time marketing your work and take care of your money if you ever make some. In any case, I salute Bryce Courtenay for all he has achieved throughout his life and for being such a great inspiration to all aspiring writers out there.

Cadzow’s full–length article can be found here.

Bryce Courtenay’s final book, Jack of Diamonds

Stieg Larrson rules Australian book sales in 2010

January 11, 2011 in Blogging, Book Reviews, Novel, On Writing

Stieg Larsson

No real surprises as the 2010 Australian book sale figures (via Nielson Bookscan) were released today.

Stieg Larsson’s Swedish-translated bestseller, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (my review of the book here), topped the charts with around 400,000 copies sold in 2010, and the other two books in the series, The Girl Who Played with Fire and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest pushed total sales of the Millennium Trilogy to over 1 million.

I personally thought the book was pretty good, but as I said it the review, not entirely worthy of the insane hype.  I’ve got the next two books of the trilogy lined up, I just need to get around to reading them!

Anyway, no doubt the Swedish versions of the first two films have attributed to the strong sales of the books, and with the Hollywood version of the first film due to hit cinemas December 2011, expect the books to continue selling.

Nevertheless, it was good to see the 2009 chart topper, Twilight, slow down a little despite what feels like its ten millionth reprint in yet another different coloured version.

Another strong seller was Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat Pray Love (250,000 copies), probably also helped by the Julia Roberts’ film based on the book (which I am yet to see but heard was complete trash).

A bunch of cook books also did well, thanks to the TV juggernaught Masterchef.

The top selling Australian author was Bryce Courtenay, whose book Fortune Cookie sold 104,000 copies.  Di Morrisey’s The Plantation was not too far behind with 101,000, and various biographies (Ben Cousins, John Howard, Anh Do) sold around 70,000.

For the year, the Australian book industry sold 66.2 million books (not too bad for a country of under 22 million), which was up 0.4% in volume but a drop of 4.2% in value because of lower book prices.  With the iPad, Kindle and other e-readers starting to penetrate the market, I wonder which direction sales will go in the coming decade?

In any case, these figures show just how hard it is to make a living as an author in Australia.  Unless you can break into the international market, it’s almost impossible to not require a day job.  Discouraging, no doubt, but an aspiring writer can still dream, right?

 
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