My Epic Indiana Pacers 2013-2014 Season Preview and Predictions

October 28, 2013 in Basketball, Best Of, Indiana Pacers, NBA, Sport by pacejmiller

The Indiana Pacers are ready to go for it all this season

(This article was first posted on Pacers Pulse)

With renewed hope and high expectations, the Indiana Pacers will finally kick off their 2013-2014 campaign on Oct. 29 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse against the Orlando Magic. After coming within a single game of the NBA Finals last season, the Pacers are “all in” this time around, according to team president Larry Bird, who claims to have signed every player the team went after this offseason. These include securing a new 3-year deal with veteran power forward David West, signing the future face of the franchise, Paul George, to a max extension, and acquiring key role players such as CJ Watson, Chris Copeland and Luis Scola to bolster their bench, the team’s biggest weakness from the last couple of years.

Throw in the return of former leading scorer Danny Granger, who missed all but 5 games last season and underwent knee surgery in April, and taking into account the continued development of George Hill, Paul George, Roy Hibbert and Lance Stephenson, there is a good reason why the Pacers are optimistic about their chances of toppling the two-time defending champions Miami Heat this year.

That said, the Heat, who lost Mike Miller but added injury-prine Greg Oden and pothead Michael Beasley to their lineup this offseason, are far from the only obstacles in the Pacers’ way. Derrick Rose is back and looking more explosive than ever in Chicago, the Brooklyn Nets added aging Hall of Famers Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce to its All-Star core of Deron Williams, Joe Johnson and Brook Lopez, and New York, last season’s No. 2 seed, has added shooting big man Andre Bargnani. And that’s just in the Eastern Conference.

Out West, Dwight Howard has joined James Harden and the Houston Rockets, instantly shifting them into title contention. Former Celtics coach Doc Rivers (recognized as one of the best coaches in the league) has replaced Vinny Del Negro (recognized as one of the worst coaches ever) in LA for the Clippers, which also added shooting prowess via JJ Reddick, a solid backup PG in former Pacer Darren Collison and veteran leadership in Antawn Jamison. Steph Curry and the Golden State Warriors have taken another step towards serious contention with the addition of versatile swingman Andre Iguadala and will bring back former All-Star center Andrew Bogut from injury. Russell Westbrook will also be back from injury, making the Oklahoma City Thunder a Finals favorite again, and the Memphis Grizzlies added a healthy Mike Miller to ignite their anemic offense and bolster their crazy defense.

So yeah, the Pacers aren’t the only team to have made improvements this offseason. Apart from Memphis, they are also the only title contending team without a true superstar closer, though Paul George appears to be heading in that direction. They won’t be a favorite among the bookies, but they’ll be right in the mix come playoff time, and for a small market team incapable of attracting big name free agents, that’s pretty much all you can for hope for.

Offseason transaction summary

Re-signings:

PF David West (17.1 points, 7.7 rebounds last season) — 3-year extension worth $36m

G/F Paul George (17.4 points, 7.6 rebounds, 4.1 assists last season)  – 5-year max extension between $80m-100m

Additions:

PF Luis Scola (12.8ppg, 6.6rpg last season) –traded from Phoenix

F Chris Copeland (8.7ppg, 42.1% 3P last season) — restricted free agent from New York

PG CJ Watson (6.8ppg, 2apg last season) — free agent from Brooklyn

PG Donald Sloan (3.5ppg, 1.7apg last season) — free agent from New Orleans

SF Solomon Hill (rookie)

*G/F Rasual Butler (D-League last season) has made the team due to Danny Granger’s calf injury, but it is possible he could be waived if and when Granger recovers

Subtractions:

PF Tyler Hansbrough (7ppg, 4.6rpg) — to Toronto

G/F Gerald Green (7ppg, 36.6% FG) — to Phoenix

PG DJ Augustin (4.7ppg, 2.2apg, 35% FG last season) — to Toronto

PF/C Miles Plumlee (0.9ppg, 23.8% FG) — to Phoenix

PF/C Jeff Ayers (formerly Pendergraph) (3.9ppg, 2.8rpg) — to San Antonio

SF Sam Young (2.8ppg, 39.2% FG last season) — free agent (waived by San Antonio)

PG Ben Hansbrough (2ppg, 33% FG last season) — Spanish league

Coaching changes:

Replaced associate head coach Brian Shaw (new Denver Nuggets head coach) with former NBA head coach Nate McMillan

Replaced assistant coach Jim Boylen (to San Antonio) with former Nets assistant coach Popeye Jones

Grade

On paper, the Pacers appear to have done really well this offseason. David West is the heart and soul of the team, a player whose steady offensive game on the court is only matched by his positive influence in the locker room off the court. Re-signing him was the team’s No. 1 priority and they got it done without breaking the bank, though some might argue that at 33 years old, a 3-year extension might have been too long. But West’s leadership is far too valuable for this team and most believe his old-school game will transition well as he ages.

The max extension to Paul George is a no-brainer. He has earned that after winning Most Improved Player last season, getting on the All-NBA Third Team and leading the Pacers in the playoffs with a string of excellent performances. His offensive game still needs improvement, but he has plenty of potential to be a deadly scorer and is already one of the best wing defenders in the league.

As for the new additions — so far so good. They said the same things last year when they brought in DJ Augustin, Gerald Green and Ian Mahinmi, and to a lesser extent Sam Young. Those guys were supposed represent a strong bench unit, and we all saw what happened then. The only guy still left is Mahinmi, who is serviceable as a backup center and valuable because of his rare size. Now the Pacers have brought in CJ Watson, Chris Copeland and Luis Scola to replace Augustin, Green and Tyler Hansbrough, and objectively speaking they are all upgrades.

Augustin struggled defensively because of his size and didn’t find his shot until late in the season. Watson, on the other hand, is a couple of inches taller at 6’2″ and is a solid defender who once played in Tom Thibadeau’s suffocating system in Chicago. And from what I’ve seen from him in the preseason, Watson is an upgrade over Augustin offensively as well. Green is a flashy leaper with streaky outside shooting, poor defense and basement-low basketball IQ. Chris Copeland doesn’t have the athleticism and is a questionable defender, plus he is also streaky with his outside shot, as we’ve seen this preseason — but he does have better basketball IQ. If he can reproduce the type of shots he did against the Pacers last playoffs while with the Knicks then Copeland should also be a sizable update. Luis Scola vs Tyler Hansbrough, on the other hand, is an open and shut case. Scola is one of the most skilled offensive big man in the NBA, while Hansbrough is a raging bull who rarely passes and takes ugly-looking shots. The Pacers will miss Tyler’s endless energy and excellent fashion choices, but apart from that the Pacers love absolutely everything about this upgrade.

The selection of rookie Solomon Hill with the 23rd pick of the first round in the 2013 NBA Draft caused much ridicule and derision at the time. There were supposedly better options at that pick for the Pacers, but instead they went with a 4-year collegiate widely expected to go in the second round, someone with not a lot of upside and plays the same position as Paul George and Danny Granger. But let’s be honest. It was a weak draft and the Pacers weren’t going to get a stud at No. 23. So instead they went with a solid, experience player who makes few mistakes and might be able to contribute right away. On this loaded roster gunning for a title, however, it’s unlikely Hill will get any meaningful playing time this season. But that’s OK. The Pacers will give him time to develop by practising with this bunch and when Granger is gone after this season he could be transformed into a solid backup for Paul George. That’s what I guess the plan is, anyway.

The signings of Donald Sloan and Rasual Butler are insurance policies in case of injuries. Butler was supposed to be waived before the start of the season to trim the roster down to 13 players as expected, but since Granger is not yet 100% and will miss at least the first 2 games it appears the Pacers will have 14 players on their roster for the foreseeable future.

On the coaching side, the departure of Brian Shaw to Denver is a huge loss. The players speak fondly of Shaw and the young guys credit him with their development. The guy replacing him, Nate McMillan, is no slouch, having prevously been the head coach of the Seattle Supersonics and Portland Trailblazers for nearly 12 combined seasons. The hiring of former rebounding ace Popeye Jones to replace long-time assistant Jim Boylen is also interesting. Jones doesn’t have Boylen’s coaching experience but he does have ample experience as a player, having played 12 NBA seasons on six different teams. Even if the net result is a negative it’s not a big negative.

Overall, I’d have to give the Pacers’ offeseason moves a solid A- based on their re-signing of West, extension of George and the new additions of Scola and Watson. The verdict on the Copeland signing remains unclear, as does the selection of rookie Solomon Hill, and the loss of Brian Shaw still stings. But given the circumstances, this was a great offseason.

Roster comparison 2012/2013 vs 2013/2014

2012-2013 Roster 2013-2014 Roster
Starters Starters
PG George Hill PG George Hill
SG Lance Stephenson SG Paul George
SF Paul George SF Danny Granger**
PF David West PF David West
C Roy Hibbert C Roy Hibbert
Reserves Reserves
F Danny Granger* G/F Lance Stephenson
PF Tyler Hansbrough F/C Luis Scola
PG DJ Augustin PG CJ Watson
G/F Gerald Green F Chris Copeland
F/C Ian Mahinmi C Ian Mahinmi
SG Orlando Johnson SG Orlando Johnson
SF Sam Young SF Solomon Hill
PG Ben Hansbrough PG Donald Sloan
F/C Jeff Ayers G/F Rasual Butler
F/C Miles Plumlee TBA

* Only played 5 games all season

** It has been strongly suggested that Danny Granger will start if (and that is a big IF) he is fully healthy, with Paul George moved to SG (the other wing position) and Lance Stephenson shifted to the bench to run the second unit. If not, assume that the starting lineup will be the same as last season, with George starting at SF and Stephenson starting at SG, and with Granger being the first or second primary offensive option in the second unit.

*Sorry Rasual Butler, you missed the cut!

This chart is based on the likley positions that the players will play in the upcoming season. As the depth chart indicates, with multiple players capable of playing multiple positions, the Pacers will have at least 3 players capable of playing each of the 5 positions on the floor. Strictly speaking, George Hill can also play SG and Ian Mahinmi can also play PF, though you might not see it much, if at all, this season.

Rotations

The last couple of games of the preseason were supposed to provide an indication of how coach Frank Vogel intended to split minutes between his players, but the loss of Danny Granger to a calf injury (he won’t be ready for the season opener and his return and eventual return to form remains uncertain) and two blowout wins have kept the allocation of playing time a mystery.

The way I see it, George Hill and CJ Watson will split the minutes at point guard, around a roughly 28-20 split, with Donald Sloan as a insurance policy for injuries and blowouts. Paul George, regardless of position, will play the most of any Pacer this year, around 36-38 minutes a game (at least), because he’s getting THAT good. David West played 33 minutes a game last season, but with his age creeping up and the addition of Luis Scola, expect his playing time to drop to around 30.  Roy Hibbert, depending on whether he can stay out of foul trouble, will hopefully average around 28-32 minutes per game.

NBA: Preseason-Chicago Bulls at Indiana Pacers

That leaves about 58-60 minutes to split equally between Danny Granger and Lance Stephenson, with perhaps a little to spare for Orlando Johnson and/or Solomon Hill, two guys I think won’t see much court time unless there are blowouts or injuries. Chris Copeland might also get some minutes at the SF position, but it has already been indicated that he will get most of his playing time at PF, which means he might not see much court time at all because of Luis Scola.

Scola should except to average around 20+ minutes a game, taking up almost all of David West’s spare minutes at PF and also playing a bit of center against smaller lineups. Ian Mahinmi, depending on the quality of his play and matchups, should expect to play around 12-15 minutes a game, but if he’s not getting the job done expect Vogel to rely more on Hibbert and Scola at the center spots. The guys facing the most uncertainty in terms of playing time should be Copeland and Mahinmi, meaning they could play significant minutes one night and close to nothing the next.

The Danny Granger situation

The offseason re-signings of David West and Paul George, along with the deals the Pacers made with George Hill (5 years, $40m) and Roy Hibbert (4 years, $58m) last offseason (in addition with a likely extension to Lance Stephenson next year) means this is likely Danny Granger’s last year as a Pacer no matter what happens this year. The Pacers have repeatedly said they will avoid the luxury tax and Granger, even with his injury woes, would never accept a minimum contract.

Larry Bird was frank when questioned about the Granger situation: if he’s not struggling or not fitting in well they will try to unload him before the trade deadline in February to lock up some cheap assets, cap space, and/or possibly draft picks; if he’s playing well and making a significant contribution they will roll the dice with him in the playoffs, hoping he can help deliver Indiana its first NBA title, and then worry about his future when the time comes. Actually, simply letting Granger’s contract expire will clear up about $14m in cap space, which is exactly what the Pacers need given the extension they just gave to Paul George and the one they will give Lance Stephenson next offseason.

Granger for Rajon Rondo?

A potential trade that has been brought up numerous times has been Danny Granger for the Celtics’ PG Rajon Rondo, who is recovering from a torn ACL but would give the Pacers a dominant floor general who can control an entire game with his passing alone. Adding the tough, crafty Rondo to a starting lineup with Paul George, David West and Roy Hibbert would be absolutely spectacular and would instantly elevate the Pacers into the top echelon of title contenders.

The Celtics are claiming that Rondo remains a part of their future, but everyone knows that Danny Ainge is blowing things up, leading to many analysts predicting that Rondo will be gone from Boston before the trade deadline. The Pacers have made it clear they are listening to offers for Granger. The salaries roughly match (Granger $14m, Rondo $12-13m) and Granger’s is valuable because it is expiring at the end of the season. But most people believe Ainge will ask for a lot more than just Granger and a first round draft pick in the upcoming draft, the most promising in a decade with the likes of Andrew Wiggins and Dante Exum set to enter the league.

Besides, luxury tax ramifications essentially mean this deal is already dead in the water. With Paul George signed to a max extension, even if you take Granger off the Pacers’ books completely it would still put them at around $65m in 2014/2015, which would still be perilously close to the luxury tax threshold (this year it’s $71.7m). This means unless they waive Luis Scola and his $4.9m non-guaranteed contract next year, a Granger-Rondo trade could very well put them over the top. And this doesn’t even take into account the extension they are almost certain to give to Lance Stephenson.

In any case,  even if Rondo somehow comes to Indiana, what does that mean for the incumbent starter George Hill, who still has 4 years left on his contract with the Pacers? Will they move him to clear cap space or will they shift him to the type of bench role he thrived in in San Antonio? They could also move him to shooting guard as he is comfortable without the ball, though he would be undersized at that position at 6’3″.

It’s an intriguing fantasy trade situation, but it’s nearly impossible to imagine such a deal being pulled off right now with so many variables left hanging. Both Granger’s and Rondo’s health are unknowns at the moment, and it’s questionable whether the Pacers would even pull the trigger on such a trade considering how much they love Hill (remember, they gave up Kawhi “Future Superstar” Leonard for him) and the fact that Rondo’s enigmatic personality could unsettle the Pacers’ harmonious locker room. Still, if the Pacers underachieve out of the gate and don’t appear to be able to edge Miami or Chicago in a 7-game series, I would definitely take the gamble on Rondo (if a trade is possible) because he instantly makes the Pacers a top contender.

Granger for Eric Gordon?

Another potential trade discussed around water coolers is Granger for New Orleans Pelicans shooting guard Eric Gordon. The main reason people are bringing this up is because Granger is a native of New Orleans and Gordon is a native of Indiana, and Indiana would really love an athletic offensive threat like Gordon at SG that would allow Paul George to remain in his preferred role of SF. It also sounds like a fair gamble because both guys are also injury prone (Gordon played just 42 games last season and averaged 17 points) and their $14m salaries are a perfect match.

But with Gordon’s health being a major concern at just 24 years old and his character questioned after he rejected New Orlean’s extension offer in a ploy to play for the Phoenix Suns, I have more doubts about this trade than the Rondo one. And the same luxury tax ramifications that apply to Rondo apply for Gordon as well, so you might as well forget about it.

Preseason record

vs Chicago L 82-76 (0-1)

vs Houston (Manila) L 116-96 (0-2)

@ Houston (Taipei) L 107-98 (0-3)

vs Dallas L 92-85 (0-4)

@ Chicago L 103-98 (0-5)

@ Cleveland W 102-79 (1-5)

@ Atlanta W 107-89 (2-5)

@ Dallas W 98-77 (3-5)

Season schedule

Full season schedule here

The Pacers have 2 games in October, at home against the Magic in the first game of the new NBA season, followed by a road game against the New Orleans Pelicans a day later. It would be good to start off on a strong note with 2 big wins against non-playoff teams, but the start of the regular season is a weird time where teams may be out of synch.

November is a relatively even month for the Pacers with 8 home games and 6 road games. There are some tough matchups with 2 games against the Bulls and games against Brooklyn, Memphis and New York, but also some easy ones against Toronto, Milwaukee, Boston, Philadelphia and Charlotte. The Pacers need to kill November because December is hell, starting with a 5-game West coast road trip (including San Antonio and Oklahoma City back-to-back), then 2 games apiece against Miami and Brooklyn and another against Houston.

January features another 5-game road trip out West albeit against weaker opponents this time and 8 road games against 6 home games, but it’s a relatively lighter part of the schedule and the Pacers need to take advantage of it. February is the home-heavy portion of the schedule with 8 home games against 4 road games, while March is the opposite with a grueling 11 road games against just 7 home games. If the Pacers make it through March looking good then they are in good shape, though they will play two title contenders — Miami and Oklahoma City — before finishing the season the way they started, against Orlando.

Outlook and predictions

Regular season

The Indiana Pacers finished last season with 49 wins (in 81 games — the Celtics game near the end of the season was canceled because of the Boston bombings) and it should be a goal for the team to crack the 52-win mark this season. Three more wins with an extra played game doesn’t sound like much, but with Miami still being Miami, Chicago having Derrick Rose back and a newly bolstered Brooklyn lineup, the Pacers will have their work cut out for them. And don’t forget, the Knicks won more games than the Pacers last season and will be itching for payback when the 2 teams meet after the Pacers ousted them in the Conference Seminfals. Eastern Conference team such as Detroit, Washington and Cleveland also got better.

Some analysts have gone as far as predicting that the Pacers will crack 60-wins this season and claim the top seed, but I think that is being way too optimistic. If we take injuries out of the equation for the moment, I would still place Chicago and Miami (in that order) ahead of Indiana in the standings. Provided Derrick Rose’s knee holds up, the Bulls should be the best regular season team in the entire NBA this year, with Miami in second place in the East depending on Wade’s health and how bored LeBron gets. That puts the Pacers in a race for the 3rd seed alongside Brooklyn and New York. The Nets, which tied the Pacers with 49 wins last season (but lost the tiebreaker) are an unknown entity at the moment because of Deron William’s health and question marks over how much is left in the tank for KG and Pierce, not to mention the difficulties of incorporating 2 new key players (3 if you include Jason Terry) and a brand new rookie head coach in Jason Kidd. I also have doubts New York can duplicate their 54-win performance from last season.

So I see the Pacers finishing anywhere between 51-55 wins and a potential 3rd or 4th seed. This all of course depends on health. An injury to George or Hibbert in particular would pretty much derail the entire team’s chances, though if Granger (eventually) fits into the lineup like a glove the sky’s the limit for this team. Injuries to players in Miami (Wade), Chicago (Rose, Noah) and Brooklyn (take your pick) might also play a big factor in how each team finishes on the ladder.

Indiana Pacers players stand during a time out in an NBA basketball game in Indianapolis

Playoffs

That said, I wouldn’t be too concerned even if the Pacers did finish (what would appear to be a disappointing) 4th or 5th in the East because this is a team built for the playoffs. Besides, if we assume that all teams want to avoid Miami for as long as possible and that the Bulls will clinch the first seed, then a first round matchup against the Knicks as either the 4th of 5th seed is not all that bad. This is because the Pacers have already proven that they can beat the Knicks even without home court advantage, and it means as the winner of that matchup they’d play the 1st seed in the next round, thereby avoiding a potential Miami confrontation until the Conference Finals.

But the serious question is: can the Pacers beat Chicago or Miami in a 7-game series with this current roster? I think they can, but only with home court advantage (which they likely won’t have). Without it, they will need some luck (calls, injuries, Chris Copeland catching fire, etc) and a breakout series performance from a guy or two.

If the Pacers somehow make the Finals, then what? I’d like to think anything can happen, though they’ll be considered underdogs against the likes of San Antonio and Oklahoma City, especially without home court advantage. I do, however, like the Pacers’ odds if they face the Clippers, Rockets, Grizzlies or even Warriors in the Finals.

Player predictions

I expect big things from Paul George this year, but for the sake of the team, not TOO big. The reason is because if George gets on another All-NBA team (he was on the 3rd team last season), he’ll become eligible for the Derrick Rose rule, meaning his max extension will take up 30% of the team’s salary instead of the standard 25%. That would seriously hamper the Pacers’ financial flexibility moving forward. As Zach Lowe from Grantland says, it’s probable that George won’t make an All-NBA team this year with the likes of LeBron, Durant, Dirk, Love, Carmelo, Griffin, Duncan and Howard taking up 8 of the 9 slots already.

So what is a realistic prediction for PG24? From what I’ve seen of him in the preseason, he’s ready to take the next step. He will be more confident this year with the ball in his hands and will want the ball more in clutch situations. His ability to take his man on-on-man, especially with a deadly pull-up jumper, will open up more opportunities to take the ball into the lane, where he has also proven that he can convert with contact. My estimation is that George will average around 20 points a game, grab 6-8 rebounds and dish out 4-6 assists while shooting at least 45% from the field (he shot 41.9% last season) and 85% from the line (he shot 80% last season). That and solidifying his reputation as one of the best wing defenders in the league.

Roy Hibbert will start off the 2013/2014 season much better than the 2012/2013 season. Whether it was an undisclosed wrist injury from MMA training or pressure from his new contract or a combination of both, Hibbert was abysmal in the first couple of months of last season before slowly rounding into form and becoming a beast in the playoffs. He is supposed to have buffed up a lot this offseason, as evidenced by the infamous photo with Tim Duncan, but I don’t expect Roy to have a big year on offense. He averaged 11.9 points in the regular season and 17 points in the playoffs in 2012/2013, and my guess is that his scoring average this season will be closer to the former than the latter, with perhaps an increase of a point or two as his shooting percentage creeps closer to 50%. But I do expect Hibbert and his “verticality” to make him a prime candidate for Defensive Player of the Year. I’m looking for him to average 2.5-3 blocks a game and close to 10 boards. The rest will be up to the judges.

I don’t expect George Hill’s numbers to change much, though David West should experience a natural decline with his minutes and touches dwindling in favor of George, Granger and Scola. As for Lance Stephenson, as the value of his extension will be determined by his play this year, expect him to take another step forward with his progress. I don’t know if he will necessarily score a lot of points, but he should be a valuable role player who fills up the stat sheet in other categories such as rebounds and assists. I wouldn’t be surprised if he grabbed a triple-double this year.

Off the bench, I expect Luis Scola to lead the way offensively and be the only double-digit scorer in the second unit (unless Granger is there with him or Lance blows up offensively). CJ Watson has really impressed me so far and he should be a solid backup PG who can score and defend without putting up flashy numbers. Unfortunately, Chris Copeland looks like he could be a disappointment, but as long as he hits the big shots when they count he is still a worthy investment. Ian Mahinmi will be serviceable but I also don’t expect him to suddenly become anything more than what he’s shown the last couple of seasons.

Rookie Solomon Hill might get some minutes if there are injuries, but this will likely be a watch and learn year for him. Guys like Orlando JohnsonDonald Sloan and Rasual Butler will see mainly garbage time only, but personally I would like to see more minutes for Johnson.

Last, but not least, Danny Granger, whose return from knee surgery has been anything but a smooth ride. I would really love to see him get back to even just 60% of his old self, but right now the most important thing for him is to get healthy and play some minutes to get his shooting legs back. To be honest I remain a little pessimistic about Granger. The odds of a player who had been in decline for a couple of years (even before the injury) making a huge comeback are extremely low. The best case scenario, by my standards, is that he plays 70 games, shoots well (eventually) to provide some much-needed offense on either unit, and average a relatively efficient 10-12 points a game. Even if he just settles into a James Posey-type of role (three pointers, veteran leadership and defense), that’s fine too. The worst case scenario is that he’ll have a setback and play only a handful of games in another wasted season, or never find his groove in the offense and ends up getting a bunch of morale-killing DNP-coach’s decision on his game log.

Beyond 2013/2014

The ramifications of the Paul George max extension are complex and interesting, and they are explained well in this article. In short, all that financial flexibility the Pacers appeared to have is now pretty much gone after the George extension and the deals to George Hill, Roy Hibbert and David West. These four guys are the team’s core for the next 3 years, so the expenditure is understandable, especially if you consider that the Pacers need to overpay players to stay in Indiana because of its small market status. Larry Bird has repeatedly stated that Lance Stephenson will be “taken care of”, meaning Born Ready will likely get a lucrative extension of his own before he becomes a restricted free agent at the end of this season. Of course, Lance is not a max player, but his versatility and potential make him a valuable commodity worthy of a mid-level contract.

What all this means is that when Stephenson is re-signed and George’s extension kicks in at the start of the 2014/2015 season, the Pacers won’t have a lot of room to move. I don’t think the Pacers can or will move Granger. The possibility that Granger can put the Pacers over the top in the East makes him too valuable to just throw away for spare parts, which suggests to me that the Pacers will roll the dice with him and let him play out the season. In other words, they will let Granger go for nothing at the end of the season no matter what happens and collect the benefits from the $14m in cap space he takes with him. Even then, the Pacers will be effectively capped out until the 2015/2016, with only the ability to tweak the roster around the edges before that time comes.

But that is by no means a horrible predicament to be in. They already proved last season they don’t need Granger to contend with a starting lineup of Hill, Stephenson, George, West and Hibbert, an impressive core they will have locked in until the end of 2014/2015, and possibly a year longer if West and Hibbert pick up their player options. While West will slowly decline with age, the other four guys should improve during this period, with the potential of George becoming a legitimate 2-way superstar. So Pacers fans can relax for now knowing that their team will stay in tact and challenge for the NBA title over the next 2 to 3 years, with their centerpiece Paul George locked in until the end of 2018/2019. Given the salary cap and luxury tax implications, however, it appears that this will be a team that can only improve internally through the development of its existing players, and that any personnel movements will be around the edges to fill in minor holes and gaps in the roster.

Let’s finish up with what Jalen Rose and Bill Simmons have to say about the Pacers’ upcoming season.

Courtside view: Pacers vs Rockets in Taiwan

October 20, 2013 in Basketball, Best Of, Indiana Pacers, NBA, Sport, Taiwan by pacejmiller

IMG_3316

Outside Taipei Arena before the game

I’m usually not into hyperbole, but last Sunday was one of the greatest days of my life. Yes, that’s right — I sat courtside for the Indiana Pacers/Houston Rockets game at Taipei Arena on Oct. 13.

Allow me to put that in perspective. It’s not easy being a Pacers fan (because there are so few of us, or so I thought), especially one growing up in Australia. The Indiana Pacers remain the only NBA team I’ve ever followed, and this upcoming season marks the 20th year I’ve supported the blue and gold. I’ve checked the box scores of — and in technologically improved times, followed live or watched — every single Pacers game since the 1994 season. I was such a hardcore fan that I used to call some stupid hotline that cost like 5 bucks a minute to listen to the scores.

I was on a high when the Pacers made their one and only NBA Finals appearance in 2000 (even though I knew they didn’t stand much of a chance against Shaq and the Lakers), and I was at an all-time low after the Pacers-Pistons brawl in 2004 (which I happened to catch live on TV). I scheduled my whole honeymoon trip to the States around the Pacers’ visit to Washington DC in 2008, just so I could watch them in a meaningless game up close from the third row, even though Reggie Miller had retired, the team had missed the playoffs, AND it had David Harrison on the roster (he is still trying to get back into the league but couldn’t get a Summer League invite this year).

David Harrison, by the way, was at the game (right), along with the crazy hardhat guy who attends every Pacers game

Former Pacers first round pick David Harrison, by the way, was at the game (right), along with the crazy hardhat guy

And so I practically gave myself a heart attack when I read a few months ago that, as part of the NBA Global Games, the Pacers were coming to Taiwan in October to play an exhibition against Jeremy Lin and the Houston Rockets. It’s actually not the first time the Pacers have been to Taipei, as they played an exhibition against the Denver Nuggets in 2008, when I was studying in the UK (I remember lamenting the missed opportunity back then). My guess is that the Pacers are being picked for Taiwan because they’re a small market team that holds some cache in Taiwan because of Reggie Miller, while the marquee teams, like the Lakers, are sent to the big markets like China (like they were this year). I’m not complaining.

IMG_3698

Jeremy Lin’s ass

Though generally speaking Taiwanese people are not great at basketball, they loved their NBA and I knew the tickets would be gone as fast as they would for a Jay Chou concert. So on the day the tickets were available for sale (only through machines at 7Eleven), I made sure I got there early and reserved myself a machine. I was all hot under the collar when the sale began, and I started getting nervous when I kept being booted out of the system due to traffic overload. It happened about three times before I gave up on the cheaper tickets and just went straight to the most expensive — which I was lucky to get through to — and bought 2 tickets. The crazy part is that you then have to print out this little receipt and take it to the cashier so you can pay them IN CASH, which is outrageous considering how much the tickets cost (I refuse to divulge this information, but it was more than I could afford). Freaking out, I had to go to the ATM three times just to get enough cash out to pay for them, and I had to do it within 10 minutes or else the seat reservation would get automatically cancelled. I nearly had an out-of-body experience that afternoon.

I started to regret spending the money as soon as the tickets (the actual tickets) were printed out and placed in my hands. But after some self deliberation I decided it was worth it. After all, I didn’t foresee a trip back to the States in my near future and this was still cheaper than getting a plane ticket to fly over there. Most importantly, the Pacers are title contenders this season and I love all the guys on that team, and I would be able to see all of them — courtside! So I decided it was worth it, and this was even before Dwight Howard joined the Rockets and made them a contender too.

The game was on at 1:30pm local time at Taipei Arena, which had been modified into a bona fide NBA arena with the same backboards, rings, floors, and so forth. I had heard some people complain about the 2008 experience (Pacers-Nuggets) being somewhat underwhelming, but I think this year they really put in a lot of effort to make it as genuine as possible. After all, they had flown over not just the entire roster of players and coaching staff, but also the team owner (Herb Simon), team president Larry Bird (just my favourite non-Pacers player of all time), team mascot Boomer and the Pacemates, the team’s official cheerleading squad.

The Pacemates made it to Taipei

The Pacemates made it to Taipei

Having had to take my eldest son to the doctors in the morning and get everything settled, my wife and I were in a bit of a rush to get to the arena. We left early but went for a nice lunch at the nearby Ruth Chris Steak House (I’ll review it soon), which the Rockets apparently visited just a couple of days earlier. Strange choice to have US steak when Taiwan has some of the best food you can ever imagine, but maybe the players were feeling homesick or something.

We arrived at the arena just after 1pm. The outside was packed with people, most of them wearing Jeremy Lin jerseys and Dwight Howard T-shirts, though I was surprised to see how many there were in Pacers blue. Perhaps I was wrong about all Taiwanese ballers being bandwagon fans. Then again, the Pacers are pretty good now, and they have a legitimate two-way rising star in Paul George, currently tied with George Hill and David West as my favourite Pacers players.

George Hill is just a flat out stud

George Hill is just a flat out stud

The stupid thing about the arena is that it is strictly no food or drinks allowed. They had some stall inside selling beverages, but you couldn’t even bring your own bottle of water in. “They have bubblers inside,” is all the security guys told us. If they wanted to halve their revenue, then I guess that’s their choice.

Foxconn chairman Terry Gou got the best seat in the house, right next to the Rockets bench

Foxconn chairman Terry Gou got the best seat in the house, right next to the Rockets bench

Even stupider was the lax security screening and bag checks. I say that because I just wandered in without them checking my bag, which made me feel unsafe, but also because it meant I didn’t have to scull that 600ml bottle of water I just had with me.

Having bought the most expensive tickets available (with the exception of a NT$200,000 special package — that’s about AU$7000), we were ushered to the bottom level and walked straight onto the area surrounding the game floor. By the time we walked in there the Pacers stunt team were already doing acrobatic dunks off trampolines. The atmosphere was incredible and I could feel the excitement rushing through my veins, so much so that my hands were beginning to tremble (sad, I know).

IMG_3318

I thought our seats were slightly to the side, but as it turned out they were right on the halfway line, directly behind the scorers and announcers. In this sense the seats weren’t as good as the ones across on the other side of the court, situated right next to the sideline, but I suppose those were the NT$200,000 tickets I could only dream about.

I used the spare time to allow the moment to sink in, and that was when I spotted ex-Pacer Jalen Rose sitting at the end of the empty Rockets bench. Security wouldn’t let me get too close, but I got close enough to say hi and get a nice response from him. I’m not exactly sure why he came, but he did, along with Clyde Drexler, Robert Horry and Yao Ming, and all of them were trotted out during a break for some reason. All I recall is that Yao is a BIG dude, the biggest human I’ve ever seen, and he made the 6’8″ Jalen Rose look like a kid.

Jalen Rose

Jalen Rose

The most unfortunate thing about the whole day was that my camera, which I thought had been fully charged, was completely out of battery, meaning I had to rely on my iPad to snap photos. In retrospect, it was probably a blessing in disguise because it allowed me to focus more on the game and savour the experience rather than worrying about photos.

Yao Ming, Jalen Rose, Robert Horry and Clyde Drexler

Yao Ming, Jalen Rose, Robert Horry and Clyde Drexler

The moment the Pacers took to the floor was a stop-breathing moment. Paul George, Roy Hibbert, George Hill, David West, Danny Granger, each of them looking remarkably…normal. I don’t know what I was expecting, but they looked just as I had imagined them. Granger was the only guy I had seen in person before (2008 in DC), and this time his role on the team has changed significantly, from franchise high-volume scorer to doubted former All-Star recovering from knee surgery.

Paul George taking a jumper during warmups

Paul George taking a jumper during warm ups

I tried calling out to the players from the sideline to get their attention, but the arena was so noisy that most of them didn’t hear, or heard and didn’t respond. The only guy who looked over and nodded was Lance Stephenson. He was Born Ready to acknowledge his fans.

Oh, and before I forget, there was another team that day — the Houston Rockets, led by local favourite Jeremy Lin. Like Aussies, Taiwanese people grab on to anything and anyone with a remote link to success, and Lin is no different. The Harvard grad’s parents are from Taiwan, and so even though he’s an American born in America, to Taiwanese people it’s as good as a local product making it to the NBA. I was fascinated by the whole Linsanity thing last year like everyone else, so it was good to see him in person, but for me it was more exciting to see James Harden, Dwight Howard, and of course, coach Kevin McHale, arguably the craftiest post player of all time and former teammate of Larry Bird.

The Houston Rockets

The Houston Rockets

Lin of course of the biggest cheer when the players were introduced, and he and Paul George even showed off a bit of their Mandarin before the game (Lin obviously more so than George, who said “hello” and “thank you”).

Paul George and Jeremy Lin address the crowd

Paul George and Jeremy Lin address the crowd

Before I knew it, the game started, and I remember the first basket vividly — a two-handed put-back slam by Paul George off a missed layup by George Hill. The first Rockets basket was by — who else — Jeremy Lin, who sank a wide open three. Lin actually played really well on the day, almost like it had been scripted. He had 17 points in 35 minutes on 6 of 8 shooting before foul trouble forced him to sit and the bench warmers played out the rest of the game with the Rockets firmly ahead. He would have bee player of the game no matter where the game was played.

Jeremy Lin hits Houston's first basket of the game

Jeremy Lin hits Houston’s first basket of the game

To avoid the risk of this post going on forever, here are some general observations I had about the game and the players and the teams in general:

  • Watching the game on TV is great in terms of getting to see everything and getting replays if you miss stuff (in slow motion as well), but I do understand why people shell out lots of money to be at the games despite the hassles of travel and getting sandwiched by the crowds. The atmosphere is just different, especially when you are that close.
  • I always got the feeling that the courts felt bigger on TV and that the players, as big as they are, have more room to navigate the floor space. In person, you realize that the people are huge and the court is just as big as the ones normal people play on, and the ring is still 10 feet tall. It looks real crowded inside that three-point line and shows how just impressive these players are in being able to drive straight to the rim.
  • The only guy who got a bigger ovation than Jeremy Lin on the day was none other than Larry Legend himself when he was introduced at some point during the game. I got pretty close to him as they headed out to the locker room after the first half and was tempted to tell him how much I love him.
Larry Legend in the background

Larry Legend in the background

  • Everything about the game was pretty authentic except for the arena announcer who had a horrible accent when trying to speak English. George Hill became “Joe Heer” and Roy Hibbert became “Roy Heeber”. Seriously.
  • I reckon I could be a pretty good NBA coach because most of the things I was shouting from the sideline was similar to what Pacers coach Frank Vogel was saying (eg, “That was a flop!”, “Bad call!”, “Get back on transition!”).
Pacers coach Frank Vogel

Pacers coach Frank Vogel

  • The Pacers are going to be very good this year, even though they are not quite there yet. Paul George looks confident and ready to be a two-way superstar, and David West is just as reliable as he has always been. I don’t know if Roy Hibbert’s offense has improved much or if the improvement will manifest on the stat sheet, but his defensive game is still solid and I hope to see him in the running for Defensive Player of the Year. Danny Granger, whom I saw stretching behind the bench before checking in, is the X-factor. Jalen Rose apparently said Granger looks DONE as an elite player and he’s probably right, but it doesn’t mean he can’t still be productive in a contract year.
Danny Granger stretches behind the bench

Danny Granger stretches behind the bench

  • In a year when Miami is looking to three-peat, Derrick Rose is back in Chicago and Brooklyn has added Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce, my guess is the Pacers could finish as low as fourth in the East in the regular season, meaning they could face the top seed in the second round. As long as that top seed is the Bulls and not the Heat I think they might actually be better off. The Pacers will struggle at times during the regular season because they don’t have a bailout superstar like Lebron or Rose (unless Paul George develops into that guy), but this is a team built for the grinding style of the playoffs. Larry Bird said they’re “all in” this season, and I think the Pacers’ window for a championship will be pretty narrow, as in the next two or three years. And to win it I think they will need some luck, like a key injury to one or two of their main rivals.
  • Jeremy Lin is a god in Taiwan, which he would frown upon since he only believes in the one true God.
Jeremy Lin is a god in Taiwan...no, not THAT god

Jeremy Lin is a god in Taiwan…no, not THAT god

  • Houston is going to be dangerous this year. I’m not sure if they are contenders in the West with the likes of San Antonio, OKC, Memphis and LA Clippers, but they are definitely up there with the Golden State Warriors in terms of contention potential. If Dwight Howard meshes well and Omer Asik stays on the team and complements Howard well, then the Rockets could be really dangerous.
  • Don’t get me wrong — James Harden is awesome, practically unstoppable one-on-one, but he is also one of the biggest floppers I’ve ever seen. On literally every drive to the basket he would stick his arms out in front, flail and do this exaggerated head jerk like he had been hit by a bowling ball in the face — and more often than not he would get a foul call and two shots from the line. No wonder he led the league in free throw attempts last season.
  • Dwight Howard looked really good out there in terms of his speed and athleticism. Last season he felt a step slow, but in the 24 minutes I saw him play he was definitely a difference maker at both ends of the floor. He had a pretty poor game by his standards (10 points on 5 of 13 shooting) but he was so much quicker and more agile than the 7’2″ Hibbert (who has been working on improving his athleticism) it shocked me a little bit. If only Kevin McHale could impart some of his post moves to him…
Houston's gonna be a pretty good team this year

Houston’s gonna be a pretty good team this year

  • I got my wife to buy me a Pacers cap and David West jersey between the third and fourth quarters because the line was too long during halftime, part of it because most idiots didn’t start contemplating what they wanted to buy until they got to the front of the bloody line! Taiwan!!!

The final score was 107-98 in favour of the Rockets, which was not a big deal to me because it was a preseason game that didn’t count for anything. The only disappointment I had was that I didn’t get to see new addition Luis Scola play. Frank Vogel was resting him.

Overall, it was an amazing experience, one I will always remember. My still hope to one day head over to Indiana and watch a live playoff game (preferably a game 7, but a game 4 as they go for a sweep is good enough), but for now this will have to do.

By the way, when the game ended and the players finished exchanging hugs I decided to stick around and see if anything else was going to happen before they walked off the court. Good thing I did, because otherwise this wouldn’t be displayed in my glass cabinet at home right now.

Yes, I caught Paul George's game shoe

Yes, I caught Paul George’s game shoe

Finally, Reggie Miller is a Hall of Famer

September 10, 2012 in Basketball, Best Of, Indiana Pacers, NBA, Sport by pacejmiller

This is an article first published on Pacers Pulse.

Indiana Pacers guard Reggie Miller was finally inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame this weekend, along with former Pacers legend Mel Daniels. I say “finally” even though this is only his second year of eligibility because I, like many others, thought he should have been on the ballot last year.

This is not a time to debate whether Miller actually deserves to be in the HOF like his big sister Cheryl, a fellow HOFer whom is described as the greatest female basketball player of all time. Reggie’s credentials speak for themselves (you can check them out here), but his career has always been about much more than just stats.

Miller is a unique player and there will never be another player like him. He is almost single-handedly responsible for a whole generation of Pacers fans, including myself. Pacers Pulse would not exist with him. Well, maybe it would, but I wouldn’t be blogging on it.

Reggie was an NBA superstar despite not being known as a prolific scorer. He was an average defender in a league of great defenders. He could be regarded as one-dimensional (by NBA standards, of course). He was consistently good but rarely great, having only made the NBA Finals once and retiring without a ring. He was on a small market team. And yet he was undoubtedly a superstar that struck fear into the hearts of his opponents and their fans.

Miller inspired me because he always looked like the guy you would pick last on your team on the playground. My friends (who all went for the big market and traditionally successful teams) joked that he was an alien who should was in danger of literally slipping through the cracks in the floorboards.

Yes, he wasn’t a competitive psycopath like Michael Jordan or Kobe Bryant. He wasn’t dominant like Shaq or Lebron. He’s not athletic like Vince Carter or Blake Griffin. He looked awkward too — he didn’t have the sweet stroke of Ray Allen. But he had the audacity to believe that he belonged on the same court as them. And even if he couldn’t beat all of them, he sure tried his hardest every night. If it meant playing the villain as he often did against the Knicks, then so be it. He was never going to back down from anyone despite his physical disadvantages.

He was the ultimate professional and teammate, a guy that set an example with his relentless work ethic for 18 years. It’s not often that you see a player that hated by opponents and fans during his career be that revered by the end of it. You only need to take a look at this video to understand the impact he had in New York, where he tormented Knick fans for much of his career.

And check out the end of his final game. I don’t recall opponents doing something like this to any player other than Michael Jordan. And remember, this was merely a few months removed from that infamous brawl.

When it comes to memorable moments, Reggie Miller has a truckload of them. My favorite, unlike most others, was not the 25-point fourth quarter or the 8 points in 8.9 seconds. It was game five against the New Jersey Nets in the 2002 playoffs (back when it was a best of five series in the first round), a game I watched live on TV, where Miller hit that 40-footer at the buzzer to force overtime, and then forced a second overtime with a two-handed dunk in traffic against three Nets defenders. The Pacers eventually lost that game, but the fact that they, as the number eight seed, pushed the first seed and eventual NBA finalist that far was something I’ll never forget.

I had a final exam later that day and I remember I needed to get going soon. I was almost glad when it appeared that the Nets had put the game out of reach. And when Reggie hit that improbable bank shot, I went nuts. And so did the telecast, which went black momentarily after the shot went in, driving me even more nuts.

Then when Reggie faked the shot at the top of the key and drove into the lane instead, throwing down that insane two-handed dunk, I lost it again. This was a guy that dunked only a handful of times every season, and he had the balls to drive the ball down the throat of three defenders down by two in the dying seconds of an overtime elimination game. That’s the type of player Reggie Miller was, and I hope that is the way he will always be remembered.

Thanks for the memories Reggie, and congratulations.

Defending Reggie Miller’s Hall of Fame credentials

April 7, 2012 in Basketball, Best Of, Indiana Pacers, NBA, Sport by pacejmiller

This is an article first published on Pacers Pulse.

I can’t believe I am doing this, and the fact I feel I need to infuriates the hell out of me. But here I am, defending Reggie Miller’s induction into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

Last year, Miller didn’t just miss out on being a first-ballot Hall of Famer — he missed out on being on the finalists’ ballot completely. At the time, some said it was fair. Others called it a travesty. He may not be a first-ballot Hall of Famer, but he certainly deserves to be on the damn ballot. At the end of the day, however, no one really thought it was that big of a deal, as long as Miller’s name eventually ends up in Springfield.

This year, Miller is headlining the class of inductees, which also includes, amongst others, coach Don Nelson, former NBA champ Jamaal Wilkes and ABA star Mel Daniels. And all of a sudden there are now people who are suggesting he doesn’t deserve to be in the Hall of Fame at all? Seriously?

If you want to criticize anything, criticize the HOFs selection guidelines, or lack thereof, not the people that get selected because of it. It’s not Miller’s fault that they are letting in so many people most fans have never even heard of.

Inductees are voted in by a small committee based on subjective considerations of merit, meaning whatever they think is relevant. It’s not based on how many championship rings they’ve won, how many All-NBA First Team selections they’ve earned or their career Player Efficiency Rating. And while we’re at it, please remember that it’s the Basketball Hall of Fame, not a list of the greatest or most dominant players to have ever played the game.

Miller may not have any championships (neither does Barkley, Ewing, Malone or Stockton), an All-NBA First Team honor (he has three Third Team selections) or a higher career PER (18.4, according to Basketball-Reference.com — good for 116th in NBA history) to his name, but is he any less deserving than the people that have been selected before him (say Bailey Howell, Maurice Stokes, Adrian Dantley or Chris Mullin)? Is he any less deserving than the people selected for the class of 2012 (a class he is freaking headlining)? The Basketball Hall of Fame needs to be accepted for what it is, not what people think it should be or want it to be.

In any case, let’s take a look at Miller’s basketball career as a whole.

Miller’s raw numbers speak for themselves.

  • 11th overall pick in the 1987 NBA Draft
  • 18 seasons for the Indiana Pacers (retiring in 2005)
  • 5 All-Star appearances (90, 95, 96, 98, 00)
  • 3 All-NBA Third Team selections (95, 96, 98)
  • 1 NBA Finals appearance (2000)
  • 6 Eastern Conference Finals appearances (94, 95, 98, 99, 00, 04)
  • regular season career averages: 18.2 points, 3 rebounds, 3 assists, 1.1 steals and 1.7 turnovers
  • regular season career shooting averages: 47.1% FG, 39.5% 3P, 88.8% FT
  • playoff career averages: 20.6 points, 2.9 rebounds, 2.5 assists, 1 steal and 1.8 turnovers
  • playoff career shooting averages: 44.9% FG, 39% 3P, 89.3% FT

Very good, but not flashy, right? And before I forget, let’s throw in numbers from his college and international careers as well, since it’s the Basketball Hall of Fame, not the NBA Hall of Fame (which doesn’t exist).

  • 4 seasons for UCLA (graduating in 1987)
  • NIT championship (85), Pac-10 championship (87)
  • college averages: 17.2 points, 4.2 rebounds, 2 assists, 54.7% FG, 43.9% 3P, 83.6% FT
  • FIBA World Championship (1994) gold medal; All-Tournament Team selection; 17.1 ppg
  • Olympic Games (1996) gold medal; 11.4 ppg

These raw numbers and achievements probably won’t blow anyone away, but his career looks a lot more impressive when you start to put them in perspective.

NBA regular season

  • 14th all-time scorer (25,279)
  • 2nd all-time in three-pointers made (2,560; surpassed only by Ray Allen in 2011)
  • 9th all-time in free throw percentage (88.8%); 12th all-time in free throws made (6,237)
  • 3rd all-time in Offensive Rating (121.48)
  • 6th all-time in True Shooting Percentage (61.39%)
  • 7th all-time in games played (1,389)
  • 3rd all-time in games played with one team (1,389); 2nd all time in seasons with one team (18; behind John Stockton’s 19)
  • 11th all-time in Win Shares (174.40); 7th all-time in Offensive Win Shares
  • Led the league in free throw percentage 5 times (90-91, 98-99, 00-01, 01-02, 04-05)
  • Led the league in three-pointers made 2 times (92-93, 96-97)
  • Led the league in True Shooting Percentage 2 times (90-91, 93-94)
  • Led the league in Offensive Rating 4 times (90-91, 92-93, 93-94, 98-99)
  • Career-high 57 points (@Charlotte in 1992)
  • 1 of 5 players in NBA history to have had a 50-40-90 season (ie, to have shot 50% FG, 40% 3P and 90% FT — others being Larry Bird, Mark Price, Steven Nash and Dirk Nowitzki)

NBA Playoffs

  • 20th all-time scorer (2,972)
  • 1st all-time in three-pointers made (320)
  • 9th all-time in free throw percentage (89.3%); 15th all-time in free throws made (770)
  • 11th all-time in True Shooting Percentage (60.1%)
  • 11th all-time in Offensive Rating (119.21)
  • 19th all-time in Win Shares (19.9); 8th all-time in Offensive Win Shares (16.18)
  • Career-high 41 points (vs Milwaukee in 2000)

Indiana Pacers

  • Franchise leader in games, points, minutes, field goals, three-pointers, free throws, assists and steals
  • One of 5 Pacers to have jersey retired (others being Roger Brown, Mel Daniels, Bobby Leonard and George McGinnis)
  • First franchise player to start in an All-Star game

UCLA

  • 3rd all-time scorer, 3rd all-time in field goals made, 3rd all-time in 3P%, 4th all-time in FT%, 2nd all-time in free throws made, 8th all-time in steals
  • 2nd all-time in single season points (behind Kareem Abdul-Jabbar)
  • Holds single season records for league points (1986; 500), league scoring average (1986; 27.8), free throws made (1986; 202)
  • Holds single game record for free throws in a game (17) and in a half (13), and points in a half (33)

Team USA

  • 2nd leading scorer at 1994 FIBA World Championship (behind Shaquille O’Neal)

Miller’s numbers start to speak a lot louder when you consider the company he is in. While you ordinarily wouldn’t put Miller in the same category as some of the all-time greats because he wasn’t the type of player that regularly dominated the game, some of his numbers and records suggest otherwise. In particular, Miller’s Similarity Score at Basketball-Reference.com, which finds players throughout NBA history with the same career quality and shape, puts him in the same league as guys like Kobe Bryant, John Stockton, Clyde Drexler, Ray Allen, Steve Nash, Jerry West, Jason Kidd and Magic Johnson — all current or future Hall of Famers.

One of the most common arguments critics use to discredit Miller’s career is that he was “one-dimensional” or that he was a poor defender. I even read a recent article which claimed that all Miller did for 18 seasons was curl off screens. Sorry, but you don’t become the NBA’s 14th all-time leading scorer by just curling off screens. The Knicks’ Steve Novak is one dimensional. Former Pacer James Posey, in his last season, was one dimensional.

But anyone that has watched Miller play, especially during his prime, will know he had a surprisingly wide offensive repertoire. Defensively, his weight and lateral movement gave him problems against bigger, quicker guards, but his height (6’7”) and length troubled them too. And what do you think chasing Miller around all game did to their stamina?

In any event, being an all-round player or a wonderful defender are not prerequisites for the Hall of Fame. That’s like saying Dennis Rodman doesn’t deserve to be in it because he is not a great scorer or because Wilt Chamberlain wasn’t a good free throw shooter. If Rodman can get in for being one of the greatest rebounders of all-time, then why can’t Miller get in for being one of the greatest, if not the greatest three-point shooter of all-time?

But to debate whether Miller deserves to get in on his three-point shooting or any other of his records is missing the point entirely. The Hall of Fame should, and does, go far beyond numbers and statistics. Miller’s fame (this is the Hall of Fame, mind you) and the impact he has had on the game of basketball, especially in Indiana, the Hoosier state, puts him right up there with the all-time greats.

Miller was the face of a franchise for almost his entire career. He was Indiana’s best player for more than a decade. How many players in NBA history can say the same thing?

If you ask anyone to name a single player to have played for the Indiana Pacers, even now, chances are they would say Reggie Miller. If you ask any New York Knicks fan which player has tormented their team more than any other, apart from Michael Jordan (and possible Carmelo Anthony — kidding), chances are they would say Reggie Miller. If you ask who they would want to take a last second three-pointer with their team down by two, Reggie Miller would likely be in the top five, if not number one.

Miller might have had a couple of championships but for the guy on his left and a prime Shaquille O'Neal and a rising Kobe Bryant in 2000

If you ask someone to name the most memorable moments in NBA playoff history off the top of their head, chances are they will include Miller’s 25-point fourth quarter against the Knicks in the 1994 playoffs, and if not, certainly his 8 points in 8.9 seconds against the Knicks a year later. And what about his game-winning three-pointer over Michael Jordan in the 98 East finals, or my personal favorite, the 39-foot buzzer-beating bank shot to force the first overtime, and then the two-handed dunk to force the second one against the top-seeded Nets in 2002? How many players outside of Michael Jordan has had so many defining moments in their careers?

I get it if people want to diminish Miller’s achievements because he’s not the type of player traditional fans like. He plays for the small market Pacers. He looks like an alien and is so thin he might slip through the cracks in the floorboards; he flops a lot, likes to talk trash and enjoys playing the villain. And yes, he pushed off Jordan and then danced around in circles like a little girl (and that was because he was playing with a badly sprained ankle, for those who don’t remember). But he also struck fear into the hearts of his opponents like only the greats could.

He was a truly unique player, the kind the NBA might never see again. For that, and the impact his remarkable career had on UCLA, the Indiana Pacers, the NBA, Team USA and the sport of basketball in general — for more than two decades — no one should question Reggie Miller’s rightful inclusion in the Hall of Fame ever again.

10 Things I Loved About the 2011 NBA Playoffs

June 14, 2011 in Basketball, Indiana Pacers, NBA, Sport by pacejmiller

Ahh…it’s finally all over. The Dallas Mavericks just defeated the Miami Heat in 6 games to capture the 2011 NBA Championship in what has been the most enjoyable NBA Playoffs in recent memory. Dirk Nowitzki was named Finals MVP, elevating the big silky German to all-time great status and denying Miami’s much-maligned ‘Big Three’ of Lebron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh a chance at a title in their first year together. Loved it, loved it, loved it.

Here are the 10 things that I thought made these Playoffs one of the best ever.

(to read on, click on ‘more…’)

Read the rest of this entry →

%d bloggers like this: