Movie Review: The November Man (2014)

November 22, 2014 in Movie Reviews, Reviews by pacejmiller

november man

Whenever I see an aging star in a new action flick, I immediately think: Taken rip off! But The November Man, starring former 007 Pierce Brosnan, is no Taken imitator. It’s actually quite a clever and complicated political action thriller based on the novel There Are No Spies by Bill Granger. I wouldn’t quite put it in the 007 class, nor does it live up to the likes of the Bourne franchise, though all things considered, The November Man is a perfectly adequate and compelling film experience that proves old man Brosnan still has what it takes.

Brosnan plays Peter Devereaux, an old CIA spy who went into retirement after his protégé David Mason, played by Aussie Luke Bracey, disobeyed his order and caused a tragedy. Five years later, he is called out of retirement to obtain crucial information from a spy who has been working undercover in the offices of a politician tipped to become the next Russian president.

The plot is quite complex; I wouldn’t call it convoluted, though you do need to pay attention. Essentially, the evidence leads Peter to a refugee worker played by Olga Kurylenko, whom he must protect from a deadly assassin. At the same time, he is pitted in the field against David, who is desperate to prove himself against his ex mentor.

There are twists and turns; people are not who they seem. Most of it is fairly typical spy thriller stuff, though I was quite intrigued by the intelligent narrative and the stylish execution of Roger Donaldson, who previously collaborated with Brosnan for Dante’s Peak and has films such as Thirteen Days, Species, The Recruit and The Bank Job on his resume. Those are all fairly solid but unexceptional films, and The November Man falls in the same category.

I was never that big of a fan of Brosnan as James Bond, but he was very good in this. Looked the part, felt the part. By comparison, Luke Bracey came across as a bit out of his depth, failing to match both Brosnan’s charm and screen presence. The dynamic sort of matched what was happening between their characters on screen too.

On the whole, The November Man is neither great nor memorable, but it is still an entertaining spy action thriller that represents a welcome return to form for Brosnan.

3.5 stars out of 5

Movie Review: Into the Storm (2014)

November 20, 2014 in Movie Reviews, Reviews by pacejmiller

Into-The-Storm-poster-2

Blockbuster natural disaster movies these days tend to be either based on true events or completely made up and over the top. A couple of years ago there was The Impossible, about the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, and in recent years the world has also been rocked by made-for-TV parodies such as Sharknado.

Into the Storm is a return to the more “realistic” fictional natural disaster films such as 1996′s Twister. However, apart from superior special-effects owing to 18 years of improving technology, Into the Storm is an inferior film in every way.

In keeping up with the times, Into the Storm is a semi found-footage film in that it splices traditional filmmaking with handheld camera footage taken predominantly by two teenage brothers working on a time capsule project for school. I guess it makes the film easier to watch and less ridiculous than a film that is stitched together purely from found footage, but at the same time it feels like such a cop-out by trying to take advantage of both approaches.

The film stars Thorin Oakenshield, aka Richard Armitage, as a high school vice principal stuck in the worst storm of all time. But hey, he is freaking Thorin Oakenshield, so there is no task too difficult or dangerous for him, and it is no surprise that he is essentially a superhero in this film. If he’s not whisking high school kids to safety, he is searching for his eldest son (one of the camera wielders), who is trapped with the girl of his dreams (Aussie starlet Alycia Debnam-Carey) in an abandoned paper mill. Other times he just hangs out with a bunch of storm chasers, led by Prison Break and Walking Dead alumnus Sarah Wayne Callies. Naturally, there is also a dickhead filmmaker who doesn’t care about anyone’s safety and only just wants to get the whole thing down on camera.

Into the Storm admittedly boasts some impressive special effects, but as a whole the film is clumsy and forgettable. The characters are stock-standard and thus boring, and the danger never feels as close as it should be. You can more or less guess who’s going to die and who’s going to make it, and no amount of CGI can make up for the lack of imagination in the script or the lack of emotion in the drama.

I would have actually preferred it if the filmmakers pared back the special effects to spend more time on developing at least one character worth caring about, or if they went in the complete opposite direction to give audiences a cheesy, ridiculous spectacle where nothing is sacred. Instead, the film is stuck woefully in between, with no decent characters nor enough cheese to make it a popcorn-fun experience.

As disaster porn, Into the Storm gets the job done with its spectacular visuals and explosive carnage. If you missed it on the big screen, however, there’s probably not a whole lot the film can offer.

2.5 stars out of 5

Movie Review: These Final Hours (2014)

November 19, 2014 in Movie Reviews, Reviews by pacejmiller

TFH

Aussie movies, yay! I have been a bit of a dick when it comes to Australian movies for most of my life, but I have started to come around in recent years following a string of impressive efforts that have made the rest of the world take notice.

The latest Australian film to be a hit with the critics is These Final Hours, an apocalyptic drama about the moments before a natural disaster wipes humanity off the face of the Earth. It is great to see Aussie filmmakers take on something a little different and ambitious, and to have the skills and actors to pull it off. Even though not everything in this film worked, it is without a doubt one of the better end of the world movies I’ve seen in recent memory.

The story focuses on a young man in Perth named James (Nathan Phillips) as he struggles to cope with impending doom. At the beginning of the film we are told there’s about 12 hours before the catastrophe hits Australia’s west coast, though the majority of the plot focuses on the final 5.

It’s a character-driven film that succeeds because it explores a small sample of human reactions rather than something too broad to cover. There are scenes that suggest the budget is not that small, so it appears to be a conscious decision to keep the story small scale and personal. It does a good job of asking what you would do if the end was near. Would you confront it head on? Spend it with family? Get trashed? Party? Have sex? Kill yourself? Kill others? Or just go crazy?

These Final Hours tackles all these various possibilities with an observant eye and a sensible amount of realism and practicality. For the most part, it doesn’t over sensationalize things, nor is it too subtle for the impact to be felt the way it needs to be. There are some confronting scenes but none of them feel exploitative.

The primary catalyst for James’s character development is the young girl (Angourie Rice) he meets along the way. It was quite obvious where they were heading with the story once James runs into her — you know, the clichéd flawed guy minding his own business becomes a reluctant hero scenario — though to the credit of writer and director Zak Hilditch does a good job of keeping the narrative tight and intense for the film’s 97-minute running time.

The dialogue is OK — it’s effective at times but too scripted and melodramatic at certain moments. The ending also left a “that’s it?” taste in my mouth.  Still, the film is pretty good when put in context, but to be honest it’s nowhere near deserving of the overwhelming praise from critics and the 89% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. It is, however, probably a sign of good things to come. Jessica De Gouw, who has a supporting role in the film, is starting to earn a name for herself on the TV series Arrow and Dracula, while Sarah Snook, an extended cameo in this one, is on the rise after receiving deserved acclaim in the horror flick Jessabelle. Perhaps this can be one of those films we look back on as a turning point for many successful careers.

3.5 stars out of 5

Movie Review: The Two Faces of January (2014)

November 18, 2014 in Movie Reviews, Reviews by pacejmiller

two faces

First the mirror, now January. Seems like everyone has two faces these days.

The Two Faces of January is an intriguing and elegant thriller set in the early 1960s featuring an A-list cast. It’s based on the 1964 novel of the same name by Patricia Highsmith (who also wrote The Talented Mrs Ripley), about a young con man (Oscar Isaac from Inside Llewyn Davis) working as a tour guide in Athens who gets involved with a seemingly wealthy American tourist (Viggo Mortensen) and his young wife (Kirsten Dunst).

It’s one of those classy yet twisted tales where interesting and complex characters who are not who they seem keep falling deeper and deeper and into a mess they can’t get out of. The fun comes from not knowing who is telling the truth and who is ultimately playing whom. There are twists and turns galore, but the progression of the narrative is subtle and deliberately low-key. Rather than a series of ups and downs, the film begins on low heat and gradually simmers all the way to the end without ever boiling over.

All three leads are phenomenal, as you would expect. Viggo, in particular, always one of my fave actors, shows again why he perhaps the most versatile and underrated performer of his generation.

The confident, controlled direction of debut director Hossein Amini, who also wrote the screenplay, is enviably stylish, creating a constant sense of tension and paranoia that’s hard to shake. Amini also wrote the screenplay for Drive, one of the slickest films of 2011, and the talents he demonstrated in that adaptation are in full bloom here.

The problem with the Two Faces of January, however, is that despite its look and feel of a top-shelf, A-grade thriller, the film’s story doesn’t quite live up to everything else. When you boil it down, the plot is actually quite mediocre and over-reliant on coincidences, resulting in a limp payoff that disappoints following the spectacular set-up. It’s one of those films that comes across as much better than it really is, and the more you think about it the less impressive it becomes.

Nonetheless, I enjoyed the build up a lot and have feeling that Amini will go on to bigger and better projects. While it may fall short of potential, I’d still recommend The Two Faces of January for those with a taste for old-fashioned, character-driven thrillers.

3.5 stars out of 5

Movie Review: John Wick (2014)

November 18, 2014 in Movie Reviews, Reviews by pacejmiller

JW

Keanu’s back! And this time, instead of Japanese demons, he’s taking on a whole army of Russian gangsters with 46 less ronin by his side.

Ted “Theodore” Logan doesn’t make a lot of films these days, so when he does I always get a little excited. After last year’s disappointing 47 Ronin, he’s back this time as the titular character in John Wick, a depressed former assassin who goes on a revenge rampage after Theon Greyjoy (Alfie Allen), the son of the original Mikael Blomkvist (Michael Nyqvist), makes the mistake of messing with the wrong dude.

It sounds kinda stupid and it is, but John Wick has been a surprising hit thanks to the excellent direction of Chad Stahelski in his feature debut. The stylistic action is what sets film apart from others of the same genre, and it’s arguably the most exciting action flick in terms of gunfire and physical combat since Taken

Keanu doesn’t have a lot of expressions, and that’s perfect as Wick, a no non-sense killer and a quick, smooth and relentless one-man wrecking crew. There’s something almost mechanical in the way he beats down his opponents, and he always makes sure the job is complete with an extra bullet or two where it counts. The action sequences are long, often brutal, and extremely well choreographed, and Stahelski spares our eyes by keeping the camera steady and the rapid cuts to a minimum.

The other successful aspect of John Wick is that it doesn’t take itself too seriously, but not so unseriously that it destroys the mood. The film is admittedly dark and full of death, but it’s also littered with tongue-in-cheek jokes about the assassin “industry” or “fraternity.”  There’s a code of conduct and assassins have to abide by it or face the consequences of the wider community. The film is filled with these straight-faced gags, such as a hotel that caters especially to assassins, a dedicated mop-up crew, and so forth. I also noticed there was a nice little cameo from The Newsroom‘s Thomas Sadoski which I found to be quite fun.

In addition to Keanu’s typical Keanu performance, the rest of the cast also do a fine job in their respective roles. Nyqvist milks his charm to provide us with a villain who might not be much of an opponent for Wick if they met in a dark alley, but one who knows what he is up against and remains relatively calm amid the chaos. Alfie Allen is also terrific as a spineless little twat who has less balls than his character on Game of Thrones, while Adrianne Palicki is convicing as a female assassin who’s not afraid to bend the rules. Rounding out the cast are the likes of Bridget Moynahan, Willem Dafoe, Ian McShane, John Leguizamo and Lance Reddick, each of whom have small but key roles.

After a rolling start, the film moves at such a frantic pace that you don’t really notice its flaws all that much, except when it resorts to the old cliche where the “bad guy” has the “good guy” right where he wants him but instead of killing him on the spot decides to tie him up and give him every possible opportunity to escape. With its style, tone and gaps in logic, John Wick feels almost like a graphic novel adaptation, except it’s not, though I hear there might be opportunities to spin this first film into a franchise of some sort.

At the end of the day, I enjoyed John Wick a lot. I also think it’s a victim of its own hype. It’s the type of film that I didn’t expect to be any good, but because the reviews were so positive, I ended up having unrealistic expectations. It is what it is — a really well-executed, exciting, stylistic, and not-too-serious action flick with near-non-existent plot and not much substance. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

3.5 stars out of 5

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