Book Review: ‘Sharp Objects’ by Gillian Flynn

September 26, 2013 in Book Reviews, Reviews by pacejmiller

Sharp-Objects

I have finally finished burning through all three Gillian Flynn novels to date, with the last one being her debut novel, Sharp Objects. And now, sadly, I have no choice but to wait patiently until she produces more brilliant psychological thrillers.

Sharp Objects is told through the eyes of Camille Preaker, a Chicago reporter from a struggling newspaper who has been assigned to cover the murders of two young girls in her Missouri hometown, the place she once ruled as the most popular girl in town. But Camille is a deeply damaged person (both mentally and physically) and her homecoming is anything but smooth as she must deal with her wealthy but distant mother and stepfather, as well as her precocious 13-year-old stepsister Amma, who has taken over Camille’s former role as the queen bee.

Unlike Flynn’s breakthrough smash Gone Girl (review here), which is a rollicking delicious ride delivered at break-neck pace, or her second novel Dark Places (review here), which relies on the intrigue of a satanic worship murder mystery in a small town, Sharp Objects is more of a slow burn, reflective and contemplative — but it’s also her most personal and emotionally draining work. The tone is melancholic and downright depressing at times, but the narrative flow is dreamy — almost hypnotic — and has a way of slowly pulling you into Camille’s hazy and deranged world.

It is definitely the darkest, creepiest and most unsettling of Flynn’s three books (which is saying a lot if you have read the other two), tackling confronting themes such as serial murder, self-mutilation, depression, alcoholism, serious mental health issues (which shall remain unnamed) and the combustible mix of wealth and boredom and small-town life. And the ending of the novel — one that sent deep chills down my back — is arguably the best of all her books as well.

As with her other novels, Sharp Objects is also very much about sexual politics. For me, the most engrossing parts of the book are about Camille’s stepsister Amma, a walking contradiction who is sexual and childish, cruel and kind, domineering and needy, but at the same time she is just a sad little girl whose personality feels eerily genuine. On the other hand, I felt some of the male characters, such as the hotshot out-of-town detective Richard and the attractive prime suspect John Keene, the brother of one of the victims, were not as strong as their female counterparts.

Flynn’s is a sharp and stylishly evocative writer, though in Sharp Objects her writing is more raw and less polished (it is her first book, after all). But despite the occasional misstep, the story and characters do grow on you. It might not be her best book, but Sharp Objects could very well be the one that stays in your mind the longest after turning the last page.

4/5

PS: And yes, a movie version is coming too, but as of now there are no details on the cast or crew.