Movie Review: Stolen (2012)

September 30, 2012 in Movie Reviews, Reviews by pacejmiller

Liam Neeson’s daughter was Taken (and will be again in about another week); Nicolas Cage’s daughter is…Stolen!

I bet I’m not the only one who thought that the two movies smelled eerily similar: a kidnapped daughter; an estranged father with a certain skill-set who would do anything to get her back = an action film filled with brainless but awesome action.

But fortunately/unfortunately, that’s where the similarities end. I was actually surprised to find that Stolen, despite its  derivative title, is a completely different style of film to Taken. The latter is a dark, violent and relentless thrill ride that turned out to be one of the best action films of the last decade. The former, on the other hand, is merely an above-average, half-serious popcorn action movie starring Nicolas “I’ll do any movie for money” Cage.

Stolen‘s title is cleverer than it sounds because Cage plays Will Montgomery, “America’s greatest bank robber” (get it?). Without giving away anything more than the bare necessities, Cage’s daughter (Sami Gayle) is abducted by a vengeful village (Josh Lucas) and Will must rely on his skills to get her back with the help of former ally Riley (Malin Ackerman). Hot on his heels are a couple of inept FBI agents played by Danny Huston and Mark Valley. The result is a compact and frequently exciting 96 minutes of running around, car chases, dramatic escapes, near misses and Nic Cage being Nic Cage.

Honestly, it’s not as bad as it reads. It’s easy to be dismissive of Stolen simply because it stars Mr Cage, the Oscar winner who has in recent times delivered us such masterpieces as Ghost Rider: Spirit of VengeanceSeeking Justice, Trespass, Drive Angry, Season of the Witch and The Sorcerer’s ApprenticeBut Stolen does have its moments and is probably one of Cage’s most watchable films from the last five years.

The strangest thing with the film is that it starts off rather seriously, but becomes more and more lighthearted as it progresses, in reverse correlation to what is at stake. By the end it’s more or less a comedy — and I’m not sure if that is a good or bad thing. The film is directed by Simon West (The Expendables 2), who was also matched up with Cage in Con Air 15 years ago, and delivers a somewhat similar feel that mixes farcical situations with over-the-top action and cheesy, sarcastic humour.

Watching Stolen, however, does require one to forgo all logic and common sense. There are some pretty outrageous coincidences and situations (one involving a dislocation and another involving a dead cop) that you simply have to accept — questioning any of these things will just make the entire film fall apart. There’s also the most insulting caricature of an Australian traveller that all Aussie viewers will have to put up with for a few minutes (it might actually be the worst scene of any movie I’ve seen all year). Tanc Sade should be ashamed of himself for embarrassing all Australians by accepting a role that perpetuates the view that all Aussie travellers are obnoxious dicks who talk like Steve Irwin.

The cast (apart from the aforementioned Sade) is good but the performances are patchy. Nic Cage is Nic Cage, and you can interpret that however you want. Malin Ackerman is little more than underused eye-candy. Danny Huston feels out of place because he’s a much better actor than everyone else and he knows it. Mark Valley is effective as a twat.

The one actor that gets a paragraph all to himself is Josh Lucas. Even though he is an old hand at playing snarky villains,  I initially thought he was horribly miscast. But then I thought maybe it was just the atrocious lines he kept spewing out. And eventually I just realized he was supposed to be this hilarious. I just wish I could have figured it out sooner.

In the end, I enjoyed Stolen much more than I thought I would, and I’m not ashamed to say I did. Of course, the more I think about it the worse it gets, but the point of such movies has always been to just watch it, switch off your brain and go along for the ride.

3.25 stars out of 5